Update 43 is now available for testing on the PTS! You can read the latest patch notes here: https://forums.elderscrollsonline.com/en/categories/pts
Maintenance for the week of July 22:
• [COMPLETE] PC/Mac: NA and EU megaservers for patch maintenance – July 22, 4:00AM EDT (8:00 UTC) - 9:00AM EDT (13:00 UTC)
• Xbox: NA and EU megaservers for patch maintenance – July 24, 6:00AM EDT (10:00 UTC) - 12:00PM EDT (16:00 UTC)
• PlayStation®: NA and EU megaservers for patch maintenance – July 24, 6:00AM EDT (10:00 UTC) – 12:00PM EDT (16:00 UTC)

If The Sun Suddenly Disappeared From The World, Would Most People Notice?

  • Supreme_Atromancer
    Supreme_Atromancer
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    I feel a little personally attacked here, as I was one of the few on that other thread who don't think that Todd Howard's statement is necessarily ludicrous. FTR, I'm not at all using it to beat down other perspectives.

    I think the title of the thread misrepresents the issue, because its a reasonable interpretation of Todd's statement is about the average Tamriellan's relationship with the practise of magic , not a question of the metaphsyics explaining the laws of nature.

    I happen to think (and did say) that the discrepencies between the stated philosophy and what we see in game are largely scale- and game-limits related. If those things are taken into account, the statements aren't quite as ludicrous as they would otherwise seem.

    The Invisibility Birthsign power might be another example of a mechanical, and not a lore problem if you consider the possibility that the power isn't meant to represent arcane power, but a game mechanic used to depict the extraordinary- yet natural- talent for being really slinky.

    I'm not "against' anyone. I don't even disagree that they could have taken a more interesting route with Summerset. Just that I'm not satisfied that "Low-magic Tamriel" in the way Howard meant it is "ludicrous" or completely untenable.
    Options
  • psychotrip
    psychotrip
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    I feel a little personally attacked here, as I was one of the few on that other thread who don't think that Todd Howard's statement is necessarily ludicrous. FTR, I'm not at all using it to beat down other perspectives.

    I think the title of the thread misrepresents the issue, because its a reasonable interpretation of Todd's statement is about the average Tamriellan's relationship with the practise of magic , not a question of the metaphsyics explaining the laws of nature.

    I happen to think (and did say) that the discrepencies between the stated philosophy and what we see in game are largely scale- and game-limits related. If those things are taken into account, the statements aren't quite as ludicrous as they would otherwise seem.

    The Invisibility Birthsign power might be another example of a mechanical, and not a lore problem if you consider the possibility that the power isn't meant to represent arcane power, but a game mechanic used to depict the extraordinary- yet natural- talent for being really slinky.

    I'm not "against' anyone. I don't even disagree that they could have taken a more interesting route with Summerset. Just that I'm not satisfied that "Low-magic Tamriel" in the way Howard meant it is "ludicrous" or completely untenable.

    To be clear, seeing it on that thread was just the final impetus for me to make this thread. It was never meant to be a personal attack on you (I honestly didnt even know it was you who brought it up). As I said, I find the statement itself ridiculous, but I'm not coming down on everyone who's used it.

    Again: sorry if it came off as personal. I dont recall bringing you up at all, I dont remember your specific comment, and I only brought up the specific thread after someone directly asked.


    I do stand by my points, however. I think Todd's quote was a stupid comment that was used to justify a tonal shift in the series, I dont think it's an accurate statement on the overall ES universe, and it doesn't even make coherent sense if we consider events before Skyrim to be canon. I brought up several examples of how common magic is on Tamriel, and how casually people react to it. It just doesn't make sense, dude, and I'm not going to pretend it does.

    I very much disagree with several of your points in the post above. If even birthsigns arent meant to be taken as we see them, if we can't trust what the player experiences, if we can't trust books on the subject, or what characters say in-game, then what's the point of having consistent lore at all? I feel like the unreliable narrator trope has gone way too far here. Arguments like these only serve to cheapen the world in my eyes, and make it less interesting. Just like Todd's alleged comment, bringing us full circle.

    So yeah, I hope you dont take this as attacking you. I just see it as a spirited conversation about a franchise we both love.
    Edited by psychotrip on August 1, 2022 1:05AM
    No one is saying there aren't multiple interpretations of the lore, and we're not arguing that ESO did it "wrong".

    We're arguing that they decided to go for the most boring, mundane, seen-before interpretation possible. Like they almost always do, unless they can ride on the coat-tails of past games.
    Options
  • Supreme_Atromancer
    Supreme_Atromancer
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    psychotrip wrote: »
    I feel a little personally attacked here, as I was one of the few on that other thread who don't think that Todd Howard's statement is necessarily ludicrous. FTR, I'm not at all using it to beat down other perspectives.

    I think the title of the thread misrepresents the issue, because its a reasonable interpretation of Todd's statement is about the average Tamriellan's relationship with the practise of magic , not a question of the metaphsyics explaining the laws of nature.

    I happen to think (and did say) that the discrepencies between the stated philosophy and what we see in game are largely scale- and game-limits related. If those things are taken into account, the statements aren't quite as ludicrous as they would otherwise seem.

    The Invisibility Birthsign power might be another example of a mechanical, and not a lore problem if you consider the possibility that the power isn't meant to represent arcane power, but a game mechanic used to depict the extraordinary- yet natural- talent for being really slinky.

    I'm not "against' anyone. I don't even disagree that they could have taken a more interesting route with Summerset. Just that I'm not satisfied that "Low-magic Tamriel" in the way Howard meant it is "ludicrous" or completely untenable.

    To be clear, seeing it on that thread was just the final impetus for me to make this thread. It was never meant to be a personal attack on you (I honestly didnt even know it was you who brought it up). As I said, I find the statement itself ridiculous, but I'm not coming down on everyone who's used it.

    Again: sorry if it came off as personal. I dont recall bringing you up at all, I dont remember your specific comment, and I only brought up the specific thread after someone directly asked.


    I do stand by my points, however. I think Todd's quote was a stupid comment that was used to justify a tonal shift in the series, I dont think it's an accurate statement on the overall ES universe, and it doesn't even make coherent sense if we consider events before Skyrim to be canon. I brought up several examples of how common magic is on Tamriel, and how casually people react to it. It just doesn't make sense, dude, and I'm not going to pretend it does.

    I very much disagree with several of your points in the post above. If even birthsigns arent meant to be taken as we see them, if we can't trust what the player experiences, if we can't trust books on the subject, or what characters say in-game, then what's the point of having consistent lore at all? I feel like the unreliable narrator trope has gone way too far here. Arguments like these only serve to cheapen the world in my eyes, and make it less interesting. Just like Todd's alleged comment, bringing us full circle.

    So yeah, I hope you dont take this as attacking you. I just see it as a spirited conversation about a franchise we both love.

    I meant the "personally attacked" thing as more lighthearted than it came across, and was essentially an excuse to butt in on the convo.

    Regarding the statement I bolded above; no, it *would* be a bad idea to trust mechanics and game-limitation for lore. Its like saying the physics of Tamriel are canonically different because we can carry 200 daedric 2-handers in our backpack. Or, for a tighter analogy- and one people *are* literally trying to argue- Red Eagle was a canonical Dragonpriest because if you are high-enough in level, you can encounter him as one. If we can agree that some things absolutely are mechanical- or limitation-based, I don't think its unreasonable to say that other instances of evidence may very well be, too.

    What I definitely agree strongly on, is that its poor form to employ narrative to explain away limitations. It cheapens the lore and people can smell it a mile off.
    Options
  • tsaescishoeshiner
    tsaescishoeshiner
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    ✭✭
    By "magic" in the original statement, I think they meant something like "the study and practice of magic" or "exceptional magical effects like curses, spells, and otherworldly beings" or something like that. Things that other series have a lot more of that make ESO look grounded by comparison.

    You might ask, "If that's what they meant, why didn't they say exactly that?" Honestly, I don't think that they had to say exactly that in order to get their meaning across. Not every statement needs to be impervious to being taken too literally, especially if its intended meaning is clear in context.

    Even if you can say that magic technically permeates all of Nirn, the point stands that even an enchanted light is pretty rare to the average person in most parts of Tamriel.

    At least, that's my take on it.
    PC-NA
    in-game: @tsaescishoeshiner
    Options
  • psychotrip
    psychotrip
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    psychotrip wrote: »
    I feel a little personally attacked here, as I was one of the few on that other thread who don't think that Todd Howard's statement is necessarily ludicrous. FTR, I'm not at all using it to beat down other perspectives.

    I think the title of the thread misrepresents the issue, because its a reasonable interpretation of Todd's statement is about the average Tamriellan's relationship with the practise of magic , not a question of the metaphsyics explaining the laws of nature.

    I happen to think (and did say) that the discrepencies between the stated philosophy and what we see in game are largely scale- and game-limits related. If those things are taken into account, the statements aren't quite as ludicrous as they would otherwise seem.

    The Invisibility Birthsign power might be another example of a mechanical, and not a lore problem if you consider the possibility that the power isn't meant to represent arcane power, but a game mechanic used to depict the extraordinary- yet natural- talent for being really slinky.

    I'm not "against' anyone. I don't even disagree that they could have taken a more interesting route with Summerset. Just that I'm not satisfied that "Low-magic Tamriel" in the way Howard meant it is "ludicrous" or completely untenable.

    To be clear, seeing it on that thread was just the final impetus for me to make this thread. It was never meant to be a personal attack on you (I honestly didnt even know it was you who brought it up). As I said, I find the statement itself ridiculous, but I'm not coming down on everyone who's used it.

    Again: sorry if it came off as personal. I dont recall bringing you up at all, I dont remember your specific comment, and I only brought up the specific thread after someone directly asked.


    I do stand by my points, however. I think Todd's quote was a stupid comment that was used to justify a tonal shift in the series, I dont think it's an accurate statement on the overall ES universe, and it doesn't even make coherent sense if we consider events before Skyrim to be canon. I brought up several examples of how common magic is on Tamriel, and how casually people react to it. It just doesn't make sense, dude, and I'm not going to pretend it does.

    I very much disagree with several of your points in the post above. If even birthsigns arent meant to be taken as we see them, if we can't trust what the player experiences, if we can't trust books on the subject, or what characters say in-game, then what's the point of having consistent lore at all? I feel like the unreliable narrator trope has gone way too far here. Arguments like these only serve to cheapen the world in my eyes, and make it less interesting. Just like Todd's alleged comment, bringing us full circle.

    So yeah, I hope you dont take this as attacking you. I just see it as a spirited conversation about a franchise we both love.

    I meant the "personally attacked" thing as more lighthearted than it came across, and was essentially an excuse to butt in on the convo.

    Regarding the statement I bolded above; no, it *would* be a bad idea to trust mechanics and game-limitation for lore. Its like saying the physics of Tamriel are canonically different because we can carry 200 daedric 2-handers in our backpack. Or, for a tighter analogy- and one people *are* literally trying to argue- Red Eagle was a canonical Dragonpriest because if you are high-enough in level, you can encounter him as one. If we can agree that some things absolutely are mechanical- or limitation-based, I don't think its unreasonable to say that other instances of evidence may very well be, too.

    What I definitely agree strongly on, is that its poor form to employ narrative to explain away limitations. It cheapens the lore and people can smell it a mile off.

    I didnt say game limitations. I said what happens in the game. Npcs have MENTIONED their birthsigns before. I believe in Shivering Isles a character laments over being born under the atronach and not being able to regenerate magicka. Shadowscales are a thing. Books describe the powers birthsigns give you. Some are described more vaguely than others (the shadow, for example), but several directly mention powers and abilities. Is that just another "transcription error"?

    Mechanical LIMITATIONS are one thing. No one takes the draconian madstone quest too seriously, because we know they didnt have the resources to make a completely new fort and race of people for a single quest.

    But when mechanics and lore are explicitly linked, and when characters act like the mechanics exist in-universe, and when the player is constantly solving problems using these in-universe powers that are described in-lore, then I think it's fair for players to expect those mechanics to be roughly...true? Why else should we be interested in them if these "powers" are just some immersion breaking button that doesnt relate to whats happening in the story?

    But I can prove my point with far less words: if birthsigns dont actually give regular people magical powers, then that's boring and therefore wrong. I challenge anyone to argue with me there. How is it more interesting this way, when the magic is literally being sucked out of the setting? When earlier games were defined by how magical the world was, and how that affects society? How does this improve the setting? Because you cant convince me this was always intended. This had to be a change in the worldbuilding if it's true.

    If Morrowind was made using this logic, it would've all looked like Cheydinhal. Remember how Oblivion's loading screens claimed that Cheydinhal uses dunmer architecture? I always took that as one of their first attempts to "un-weird" the setting, which they later had to backtrack on.

    If Morrowind were made today, it would've looked like Cheydinhal, and we'd be arguing in forums about how all that talk of ash and giant bugs were just "exaggerations". That's where Todd's quote leads us. That's where the repeated "reimagining" of this franchise leads us.

    Edited by psychotrip on August 1, 2022 5:45PM
    No one is saying there aren't multiple interpretations of the lore, and we're not arguing that ESO did it "wrong".

    We're arguing that they decided to go for the most boring, mundane, seen-before interpretation possible. Like they almost always do, unless they can ride on the coat-tails of past games.
    Options
  • psychotrip
    psychotrip
    ✭✭✭✭✭

    Even if you can say that magic technically permeates all of Nirn, the point stands that even an enchanted light is pretty rare to the average person in most parts of Tamriel.



    This just. isnt. true.

    Aleswell. Wizard turns everyone invisible. The populace sees it not as some horrifying terror, completely out of step with their life experiences...but as an annoyance and a threat to their business. Why? Because no one wants to go to a haunted inn. Gee, it's almost as if haunted inns are a semi-normal thing too, huh? NPCs mention running into ghosts on the road, dude. And again, they act like it's NORMAL. How are we even still debating this? Am I insane? Have I been playing a completely different series? XD

    Hell, the people in Aleswell even thought it was FUN to be invisible at first. Magic is a relatively common thing that people in Tamriel have to deal with. Dude, I honestly feel like im being gaslit at this point. You cannot make the argument that magic is uncommon in Tamriel. You just can't. It falls apart under the slightest scrutiny. This is obviously a new decision by Bethesda.
    Edited by psychotrip on August 1, 2022 7:02PM
    No one is saying there aren't multiple interpretations of the lore, and we're not arguing that ESO did it "wrong".

    We're arguing that they decided to go for the most boring, mundane, seen-before interpretation possible. Like they almost always do, unless they can ride on the coat-tails of past games.
    Options
  • Gaebriel0410
    Gaebriel0410
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    psychotrip wrote: »
    [
    But I can prove my point with far less words: if birthsigns dont actually give regular people magical powers, then that's boring and therefore wrong. I challenge anyone to argue with me there. How is it more interesting this way, when the magic is literally being sucked out of the setting? When earlier games were defined by how magical the world was, and how that affects society? How does this improve the setting? Because you cant convince me this was always intended. This had to be a change in the worldbuilding if it's true.

    For me it's the other way around, for example I would find it boring and uninteresting if magic birthsign powers would be so common that they apply to everyone. It would take away some of the mystery and uncertainty of the world and would basically make everyone super overpowered. I always interpreted it like, how people born under a certain sign could (as opposed to always have) have those magical attributes. Since everyone having it would also mean that roughly 1/12th of the population could turn invisible at will. And it would be inconsistent with the rest of the setting, since I'd imagine no one would want to be a shopkeeper or market vendor in such an environment.

    I've played TES games since the start and I never felt like there was a tonal shift at all, it always came across as pretty grounded and gritty to me, at least in comparison to more high fantasy settings. It's what I always liked about the setting, since in high fantasy settings magic often becomes the solution to all problems.
    Options
  • psychotrip
    psychotrip
    ✭✭✭✭✭

    Even if you can say that magic technically permeates all of Nirn, the point stands that even an enchanted light is pretty rare to the average person in most parts of Tamriel.

    At least, that's my take on it.
    psychotrip wrote: »
    [
    But I can prove my point with far less words: if birthsigns dont actually give regular people magical powers, then that's boring and therefore wrong. I challenge anyone to argue with me there. How is it more interesting this way, when the magic is literally being sucked out of the setting? When earlier games were defined by how magical the world was, and how that affects society? How does this improve the setting? Because you cant convince me this was always intended. This had to be a change in the worldbuilding if it's true.

    For me it's the other way around, for example I would find it boring and uninteresting if magic birthsign powers would be so common that they apply to everyone. It would take away some of the mystery and uncertainty of the world and would basically make everyone super overpowered. I always interpreted it like, how people born under a certain sign could (as opposed to always have) have those magical attributes. Since everyone having it would also mean that roughly 1/12th of the population could turn invisible at will. And it would be inconsistent with the rest of the setting, since I'd imagine no one would want to be a shopkeeper or market vendor in such an environment.

    I've played TES games since the start and I never felt like there was a tonal shift at all, it always came across as pretty grounded and gritty to me, at least in comparison to more high fantasy settings. It's what I always liked about the setting, since in high fantasy settings magic often becomes the solution to all problems.

    Yeah we just have vastly different tastes, then. I like my fantasy to feel fantastical, and to actually address what would happen to an otherwise "human" society if magic was a part of their daily lives.

    Its why I love ES, personally.
    Edited by psychotrip on August 2, 2022 1:26AM
    No one is saying there aren't multiple interpretations of the lore, and we're not arguing that ESO did it "wrong".

    We're arguing that they decided to go for the most boring, mundane, seen-before interpretation possible. Like they almost always do, unless they can ride on the coat-tails of past games.
    Options
  • Dr_Con
    Dr_Con
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    ✭✭
    The highborns would notice first, but realize there are many sources of magic and mysticism in the elder scrolls franchise. Magic would be drawn from different realms, there's also blood magic and plenty of spells that npcs use that we don't have access to. They would even go so far as to burn a trading card game if they felt it consumed the flow of magicka or even trap magical creatures like dragons .

    I would probably give this a good read:
    https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Magic

    If a form or source of magic that is common suddenly vanishes, another form will take it up.
    Options
  • psychotrip
    psychotrip
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Dr_Con wrote: »
    The highborns would notice first, but realize there are many sources of magic and mysticism in the elder scrolls franchise. Magic would be drawn from different realms, there's also blood magic and plenty of spells that npcs use that we don't have access to. They would even go so far as to burn a trading card game if they felt it consumed the flow of magicka or even trap magical creatures like dragons .

    I would probably give this a good read:
    https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Magic

    If a form or source of magic that is common suddenly vanishes, another form will take it up.

    But the sun is gone so everyone would notice that. And probably die. The quote also says "magic" without any qualifiers. They were talking about ALL magic.

    I feel like you're not addressing the point, here.
    No one is saying there aren't multiple interpretations of the lore, and we're not arguing that ESO did it "wrong".

    We're arguing that they decided to go for the most boring, mundane, seen-before interpretation possible. Like they almost always do, unless they can ride on the coat-tails of past games.
    Options
  • Dr_Con
    Dr_Con
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    ✭✭
    psychotrip wrote: »
    Dr_Con wrote: »
    The highborns would notice first, but realize there are many sources of magic and mysticism in the elder scrolls franchise. Magic would be drawn from different realms, there's also blood magic and plenty of spells that npcs use that we don't have access to. They would even go so far as to burn a trading card game if they felt it consumed the flow of magicka or even trap magical creatures like dragons .

    I would probably give this a good read:
    https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Magic

    If a form or source of magic that is common suddenly vanishes, another form will take it up.

    But the sun is gone so everyone would notice that. And probably die. The quote also says "magic" without any qualifiers. They were talking about ALL magic.

    I feel like you're not addressing the point, here.

    I was reading through the comments and addressing some of what I read.

    to your point- in real life, everyone would notice, heck we notice when the sun has a flare.

    In parts of this game, where people are bound to towers or caverns underground, they may not notice. We also don't know how photosynthesis works in this world, but I'm pretty sure mushrooms don't need light irl and they are edible and in abundance in this world of tamriel. There's entire mythos dedicated to the sun and the moon. Particularly, it's most important to the Khajiit though I'm sure every culture would say the sun is just as important to them (I'm not even sure if Hist trees need light tbh since you can just feed them mudcrab meat wrapped in weeds apparently).

    Without the sun, however, everything would freeze in places that do not have access to geothermal or (I know I'm making this up) magickathermal sources. It's not about the crops at this point, it's about the freezing and frost. While mushrooms may still grow in the absence of sun, you would have no life in the overworld, everyone would retreat to daedric planes that do have a source of heat- if the absence of magicka or the sun doesn't bar that.

    The ice death- not an ice age- would come quickly and yes, in a dark way, Todd Howard is right, nobody would notice the sun is gone as they would freeze to death first.
    Options
  • psychotrip
    psychotrip
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    Dr_Con wrote: »
    psychotrip wrote: »
    Dr_Con wrote: »
    The highborns would notice first, but realize there are many sources of magic and mysticism in the elder scrolls franchise. Magic would be drawn from different realms, there's also blood magic and plenty of spells that npcs use that we don't have access to. They would even go so far as to burn a trading card game if they felt it consumed the flow of magicka or even trap magical creatures like dragons .

    I would probably give this a good read:
    https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Magic

    If a form or source of magic that is common suddenly vanishes, another form will take it up.

    But the sun is gone so everyone would notice that. And probably die. The quote also says "magic" without any qualifiers. They were talking about ALL magic.

    I feel like you're not addressing the point, here.

    I was reading through the comments and addressing some of what I read.

    to your point- in real life, everyone would notice, heck we notice when the sun has a flare.

    In parts of this game, where people are bound to towers or caverns underground, they may not notice. We also don't know how photosynthesis works in this world, but I'm pretty sure mushrooms don't need light irl and they are edible and in abundance in this world of tamriel. There's entire mythos dedicated to the sun and the moon. Particularly, it's most important to the Khajiit though I'm sure every culture would say the sun is just as important to them (I'm not even sure if Hist trees need light tbh since you can just feed them mudcrab meat wrapped in weeds apparently).

    Without the sun, however, everything would freeze in places that do not have access to geothermal or (I know I'm making this up) magickathermal sources. It's not about the crops at this point, it's about the freezing and frost. While mushrooms may still grow in the absence of sun, you would have no life in the overworld, everyone would retreat to daedric planes that do have a source of heat- if the absence of magicka or the sun doesn't bar that.

    The ice death- not an ice age- would come quickly and yes, in a dark way, Todd Howard is right, nobody would notice the sun is gone as they would freeze to death first.

    Exactly. This was pretty much the point of this thread. It's a ridiculous quote that shouldnt be taken seriously, and evidence of a massive tonal shift going on in the ES franchise.
    No one is saying there aren't multiple interpretations of the lore, and we're not arguing that ESO did it "wrong".

    We're arguing that they decided to go for the most boring, mundane, seen-before interpretation possible. Like they almost always do, unless they can ride on the coat-tails of past games.
    Options
  • Sinlar
    Sinlar
    ✭✭✭
    This one has no doubt that a more mundane approach would be far easier to achieve from a development perspective.
    This one also has no doubt that the exodus would be very apparent in terms of long term subscriber numbers.

    Magic is intrinsically woven into the fabric of Nirn, it is the source of our adventures there, and a true delight to minds that seek freedom from the mire of the mundane.

    What we need, are devs that are willing to project their minds into the heart of magic once more, and bring back the shining secrets that so delight.

    *Sitting in Fargrave and looking out at the horizon*
    I know they are capable of doing so.
    Options
  • Idinuse
    Idinuse
    ✭✭✭✭✭
    psychotrip wrote: »
    I think Elder Scrolls is, at its heart – and Todd Howard says this all the time – if magic left Tamriel, no one would notice, because it's very mundane at its heart.
    -Matt Firor & Rich Lambert Interview
    The sun is a magical hole in reality left behind by an extradimensional magical being. It's also essential for crops to grow, and for life in general to persist.

    Discuss.

    All I can say, from mainly a PvP perspective, is that the Magicka in ESO is the weakest of any Fantasy RPG I know of. It's about half what i.e. a sword or dagger (oh don't get me started on a clunky, heavy and hard to swing Greatsword lol) can do, all while the "skills" stamina players have, I mean there are "spells" they "cast" not using the weapon one bit like buffs, just their... Stamina(?!) are about double the worth of any "real" Magic casters, usually with two effects vs Magick's one.

    And they are so determined to have Magic be half of what Stamina is in this game it's a spread joke. Magicka have sets where "their" damage is buffed by ~360 for i.e. class or weapon skills for 4 seconds vs Stamina's ~600 for 10 or 15 seconds. Everywhere a Stamina player looks, especially sets/proc sets, they have stacks of damage buffs, enemy debuffs, crits and penetrations. Not to mention Stamina's perma CCs. Yeah fighting a player that is completely disabled for 3-5 seconds surely is skillful PvP.... Magicka CCs either don't take or they're like water on a goose. Sometimes I wonder about the pride of some Stamina players. I mean at this point it's playing "Easy Mode" with numerous " I Win Buttons". Sure I could roll these Easy Mode builds, but do contemplate over the word "balance" and share thoughts over how fun TESO PvP would be with 100% Easy Mode Stamina players.

    As a Magicka Sorcerer in this game that doesn't use pets I have to twist myself into a pretzel just to get somewhat descent damage, at the cost of crits, resources and survivability. SMH

    The Elder Scrolls Stamina Online™
    Edited by Idinuse on September 10, 2022 10:22AM
    Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium dolorem que laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt. Neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore et dolore magnam aliquam quaerat voluptatem. Ut enim ad minima veniam, quis nostrum exercitationem ullam corporis suscipit laboriosam, nisi ut aliquid ex ea commodi consequatur? Quis autem vel eum iure reprehenderit qui in ea voluptate velit esse quam nihil molestiae consequatur, vel illum qui dolorem eum fugiat quo voluptas nulla pariatur?
    Options
Sign In or Register to comment.