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The Ultimate Beginners Guide to Elder Scrolls & Roleplay in ESO!

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Welcome! Whether you are a newcomer to the Elder Scrolls Universe or Roleplaying in ESO, I have made this guide just for you!
As some of you might know, I have created a "Beginners Guide to Elder Scrolls and Roleplay in ESO" guide before, but after request on that forum for an advanced guide to go into more subjects, and some thought on my part, I have decided to put the old and the new together into this ultimate mega guide for you, the reader!
Some credit where credit is due before I begin, in which I would like to openly thank the Unofficial Elder Scrolls Pages who's lore pages has guided me and many others throughout our Elder Scrolls gaming and RP experiences. I have sourced these guys as where I found and wrote out the information from, and I will over time update this as much as possible as and when new content relates to the lore in this guide.

Now sit back, relax, and read! I hope you enjoy, and please don't hesitate to share you thoughts in the comments below!
- Sanguiness


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SECTION ZERO: TIMELINE INFORMATION
1. What Era Are You In?

SECTION ONE: THE BASICS
1. Races
2. Locations
3. Religions of Tamriel
4. Guilds
5. Scenario

SECTION TWO: LEGENDS AND STORIES
1. Nerevar and the Tribunal
2. The Dwemer and the Falmer
3. The Dragons and the Dragon War
4. The Order of Blades and the Dragonguard
5. Ayleids and their Influence
6. Death, Immortality and the Afterlife

SECTION THREE: DAEDRA AND THE SUPERNATURAL
3. Types of Lesser Daedra
4. Vampires
5. Lycanthropes
6. Hunters

SECTION FOUR: ROLEPLAY
1. Basic RP Etiquette
2. Backstory Crafting
3. Character Skills
4. Roleplay Guilds

SECTION FIVE: CONCLUSION


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What Era Are You In?

When you start to play the Elder Scrolls Online, you begin in the 2nd Era, Year 582 (written 2E 582) as Molag Bal has begun the Planemeld with Nirn and Coldharbour.
There is some conjecture as to how many years should theoretically have passed between this point and the latest ESO chapter, Blackwood, as it is claimed that all events between then and now have happened in the space of two years in game.
However, as most roleplaying communities will attest to, this just isn't logical from an RPing perspective for everything to happen in the space of two years when a great number of us, myself included, have been playing and RPing from almost launch back in 2014 (7 years ago!). So the consensus amongst the roleplaying community is this, each real life day and each real life year works just the same in roleplay, no matter the apparent time in game nor the year. With this, however, is the realisation that you are technically RPing ahead of the ESO timeline, and as such it is best not to go into detail, or mention at all if possible, events that have occurred in the ESO chapters (Vvardenfell, Summerset, Elsweyr, Greymoor, Blackwood, and the DLCs) and be as unspecific as possible when it comes to in game events relating to these.
By reckoning of most RP communities we are technically in the 2nd Era, Year 589, to upkeep with the idea of roleplay time passing in parallel to real time.

For more information regarding the Elder Scrolls Universe and it's timeline, view this site or others like it: https://elderscrolls.fandom.com/wiki/Timeline

Edited by Sanguiness130 on January 24, 2022 5:47PM
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    PART ONE: THE RACES

    The following includes a brief summary of the race titled, and the lore source if you wish to research more on each race.

    BOSMER
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Bosmer
    The Bosmer are the Elven clan-folk of Valenwood, a forested province in southwestern Tamriel. In the Empire, they are often referred to as Wood Elves, but Bosmer, Boiche, or the Tree-Sap people is what they call themselves. Bosmer rejected the stiff, formal traditions of Aldmeri high culture, preferring a more romantic, simple existence in harmony with the land and its wild beauty and creatures. They are relatively nimble and quick in body compared to their more "civilized" Altmeri cousins (who often look down upon the Bosmer as unruly and naive). Their agility makes them well-suited as scouts and thieves. However, they are also a quick-witted folk, and many pursue successful careers in scholarly pursuits or trading. Mer (the elvish races) usually live several centuries longer humans; though the topic of elvish lifespans and how old they can become, naturally and with magical assistance, is a subject of debate amongst most. Though they are considered less influential than some of their Elven brethren, the Bosmer are also relatively prone to producing offspring. As a result, they outnumber all other mer on Tamriel.

    The best archers in all of Tamriel, the Bosmer snatch and fire arrows in one continuous motion; they are even rumored to have invented the bow. They have many natural and unique abilities; notably, they can command simple-minded creatures and have a nearly chameleon-like ability to hide in forested areas. Many in the forests of Valenwood follow the tenets of the Green Pact. These "Green Pact Bosmer" are religiously carnivorous and cannibalistic, and do not harm the vegetation of Valenwood, though they are not averse to using wooden or plant-derived products created by others.

    DUNMER
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Dunmer
    https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Ashlanders
    The Dunmer, also known as Dark Elves, are the ash-skinned, typically red-eyed elven peoples of Morrowind. "Dark" is commonly understood as meaning such characteristics as "dark-skinned", "gloomy", "ill-favored by fate" and so on. The Dunmer and their national identity, however, embrace these various connotations with enthusiasm. In the Empire, "Dark Elf" is the common usage, but among their Aldmeri brethren they are called "Dunmer". Their combination of powerful intellects with strong and agile physiques produce superior warriors and sorcerers. On the battlefield, Dunmer are noted for their skill with a balanced integration of the sword, the bow and destruction magic. Mer (the elvish races) usually live several centuries longer humans; though the topic of elvish lifespans and how old they can become, naturally and with magical assistance, is a subject of debate amongst most. In character, they are grim, aloof, and reserved, as well as distrusting and disdainful of other races.

    It is worth note that the majority of the Dunmer population are part of one of the Dunmeri Great Houses, which follow the teachings of the Tribunal, or are part of an Ashlander clan, to which their beliefs are considered heretical by the Tribunal following Dunmer, as the Ashlander clans believe that the Tribunal are akin to false gods and murderers, who practice necromancy to live. As such, there is great adversity between the two groups of Dunmer.

    Dunmer distrust and are treated distrustfully by other races. They are often proud, clannish, ruthless, and cruel, from an outsider's point of view, but greatly value loyalty and family. Young female Dunmer have a reputation for promiscuity in some circles. Despite their powerful skills and strengths, the Dunmer's vengeful nature, age-old conflicts, betrayals, and ill-reputation prevent them from gaining more influence. Those born in their homeland of Morrowind before its devastation were known to be considerably less friendly than those who grew up in the Imperial tradition.

    ALTMER
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Altmer
    The Altmer, or self-titled "Cultured People", are a tall, golden-skinned race, hailing from Summerset Isle. They are also known as High Elves by the denizens of Tamriel. In the Empire, "High" is often understood to mean proud or snobbish, and as the Altmer generally personify these characteristics, the "lesser races" generally resent them. Mer (the elvish races) usually live several centuries longer humans; though the topic of elvish lifespans and how old they can become, naturally and with magical assistance, is a subject of debate amongst most. Altmer consider themselves to be the most civilized culture of Tamriel; the common tongue of the continent is based on Altmer speech and writing, and most of the Empire's arts, crafts, laws, and sciences are derived from Altmer traditions. They usually have golden, green, or amber eyes.

    The Altmer are the most strongly gifted in the arcane arts of all the races, and they are very resistant to diseases. However, they are also somewhat vulnerable to magicka, fire, frost, and shock, which makes them very weak against their strongest point - magic. They are among the longest living and most intelligent races of Tamriel, and they often become powerful magic users due to both their magical affinity and the many years they may devote to their studies.

    ORSIMER
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Orc
    Orcs, also called Orsimer or "Pariah Folk" in ancient times,are sophisticated, brutish elves of the Wrothgarian Mountains, Dragontail Mountains, Valenwood, and Orsinium (literally translated as "Orc-Town"). They are noted for their unshakable courage in war and their unflinching endurance of hardships. Orcs have elven blood, but are usually considered to be both beastfolk and goblin-ken. In the past, Orcs were widely feared and hated by the other nations and races of Tamriel. However, they have slowly won acceptance in the Empire, in particular for their distinguished service in the Emperor's Legions. Orc armorers are prized for their craftsmanship, and Orc warriors in heavy armor are among the finest front-line troops in the Empire, and are fearsome when using their berserker rage. Orcs have a lifespan similar to that of humans. Most Imperial citizens regard Orc society as rough and cruel. The Orcs of the Iliac Bay region have developed their own language, known as Orcish, and have often had their own kingdom, Orsinium.

    IMPERIAL
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Imperial
    Also known as Cyrodiils, Cyrodilics, Cyro-Nordics and Imperial Cyrods, the well-educated and well-spoken Imperials are the natives of the civilized, cosmopolitan province of Cyrodiil. Imperials are also known for the discipline and training of their citizen armies, and their respect for the rule of law. Though physically less imposing than the other races, the Imperials have proved to be shrewd diplomats and traders, and these traits, along with their remarkable skill and training as light infantry, have enabled them to subdue all the other nations and races and erect the monument to peace and prosperity that comprises the Glorious Empire. Their hegemony has waxed and waned throughout the eras, and most historians refer to three distinct Empires, the ends of which each mark a new epoch in Tamrielic history.

    KHAJIIT
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Khajiit
    Khajiit are cat-like people who come from Elsweyr, known for high intelligence and agility. These traits make them very good thieves and acrobats, but Khajiit are also fearsome warriors. However, they are rarely known to be mages. Khajiit mostly stay on land, but piracy and skooma trade does draw some to work as sailors.

    Khajiit anatomy differs greatly from both men and elves, not only because of their fur, tail, and sometimes toe-walking stance, but also their digestive system and metabolism. Khajiit, Argonians, and Imga are the so-called "beast races" of Tamriel because of these large differences. Khajiit have a lifespan similar to that of humans. There are no well-documented cases of cross-breeding between Khajiit and other races, though there are rumors of such a thing. The foreign appearance and behavior of Khajiit make them common targets of racial discrimination.

    Khajiit have various different internal species differences (which are pictured below). These all are able to interbreed with one another, and whilst not specified in lore, children of any Khajiit relationship seems to be able to be any of the below classifications, no matter what their parents are.
    Khajiit_Types.jpg

    ARGONIAN
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Argonian
    Argonians (Saxhleel, or People of the Root in their native language of Jel) are the reptilian natives of Black Marsh, a vast swampland province in southeastern Tamriel. The other races often refer to them as "lizards" or the "Lizard Folk" instead, especially when meaning to be derogatory. They are known as the foremost experts in guerrilla warfare throughout Tamriel, a reputation brought upon them by defending their borders from enemies for countless centuries. Argonians have a lifespan similar to that of humans. According to the First Era Scholar Brendan the Persistent, "The Argonian people have, throughout Tamrielic history, been perhaps the most misunderstood, vilified, and reviled of all the sentient races. Yet, those who have taken the time to experience Argonian culture have gained a greater appreciation for this noble and beautiful people." However, it should be noted that he himself went missing in his final expedition into the deeper swamps of their homeland.

    REDGUARD
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Redguard
    Redguards are the most naturally talented warriors in Tamriel. The dark-skinned, wiry-haired people of Hammerfell seem born to battle, though their pride and fierce independence of spirit makes them more suitable as scouts or skirmishers, or as free-ranging heroes and adventurers, than as rank-and-file soldiers. In addition to their cultural affinities for many armor styles and weapons (particularly swords), Redguards are also physically blessed with hardy constitutions, resistance to poison, and quickness of foot. Unlike most other human races, they are not believed to have any connection with the ancestral Nordic homeland of Atmora.

    NORD
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Nord
    The Nords are the children of the sky, a race of tall and fair-haired humans from Skyrim who are known for their incredible resistance to cold and magical frost. They are fierce, strong and enthusiastic warriors, and many become renowned warriors, soldiers and mercenaries all over Tamriel. Eager to augment their martial skills beyond the traditional methods of Skyrim, they excel in all manner of warfare, and are known as a militant people by their neighbors. Nords are also natural seamen, and have benefited from nautical trade since their first migrations from Atmora. They captain and crew many merchant fleets, and may be found all along the coasts of Tamriel.

    BRETON
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Breton
    Bretons are the human descendants of the Aldmeri-Nedic Manmer of the Merethic Era and are now the inhabitants of the province of High Rock. They are united in culture and language, even though they are divided politically, for High Rock is a fractious region. Bretons make up the peasantry, soldiery, and magical elite of the feudal kingdoms that compete for power.Many are capable mages with innate resistance to magicka. They are known for a proficiency in abstract thinking and unique customs. Bretons appear, by and large, much like other pale-skinned humans. They are usually slight of build and not as muscular as Nords or Redguards. The great diversity in their appearance is to be expected from their politically fractured society, though their clothes, accents, customs and names are fairly uniform.

    REACHMEN
    Lore Source:https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Reachmen
    The Reachmen, also known as the Witchmen of High Rock, are a tribal race of humans who inhabit the Reach in southwestern Skyrim and the neighboring Western Reach in the east of High Rock. They are believed to be closely related to the Bretons and some Reachmen believe that their people originally came from High Rock, but their ancestry spreads across many of the known races of Tamriel. At least some Reachmen are known to be descended from the Keptu clan of Nedes. Although they are thought to share descent, Bretons do not consider themselves kin to the Reachmen, and the Reachmen do not see themselves as Bretons. It's rather common throughout the generations Nords and Reachmen have intermingled and had offspring, but these relations have been shunned just as harshly as the Reachmen themselves.

    Their culture is tribal and they make little use of advanced technology; many clans utilize hides, bones and copper to make gear, while others use properly forged weapons and armor. As they are shunned by most of Nord and Breton society, they typically inhabit makeshift fortresses built into caves and ruins throughout the Reach's battle-scarred landscape. There are also some similarities in things worn by the nedic Keptu and the Reachmen, showing that a cultural exchange might have taken place.

    The Reachmen are also infamous for their advanced hedge-magic. Some Reachman mages are known to wield magic with which they can poison or corrupt nature. They are also said to have learned to control beastfolk magic, a wild hedge-wizardry, which is often described as primitive. Some Wyrd Covens, amongst them the Hagfeather Coven, the Rimerock Wyrd and the Markarth Sisters, are known to have close relations with the Reachmen and their magic.

    MAORMER
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Maormer
    Maormer, also known as Sea Elves or Tropical Elves (or derogatorily as Fish Elves), are a race of Mer that reside on the island kingdom of Pyandonea, far south of the Summerset Isles.

    Very little is known about these reclusive species, however what is known is they split off from the original Aldmeri (yes ALDMER, they were the pre-race of the Altmer) race sometime before the First Era, and have ravaged the Summerset Isles in seek to conquest them ever since. They are infamous pirates and are commonly seen attacking ships along the northern and western coasts of Tamriel.


    Edited by Sanguiness130 on December 4, 2021 7:37PM
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    PART TWO: LOCATIONS

    Tamriel, the continent in which the Elder Scrolls games take place: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Tamriel
    latest?cb=20150911030824


    CYRODIIL
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Cyrodiil
    Cyrodiil, also known as the Imperial Province, Dragon Empire, Starry Heart of Nirn, and Seat of Sundered Kings, and Cyrod in Ayleid, is a province in the south-central region of Tamriel, and the home of a humanoid race known as Imperials. The center of their Empire and seat of governance, Cyrodiil is also known as "the Heartland". The capital of Cyrodiil, and of the whole empire, the Imperial City, is located on City Isle in the center of the province, which bears the location of White-Gold Tower, possibly the most renowned monument of Tamriel. Despite some accounts describing Cyrodiil as a jungle, it primarily has a temperate climate. One scholar of the middle Second Era attributed this discrepancy to errors made during the transcription of historical texts, while another speculated that White-Gold Tower itself gradually adapted the climate to suit the region's inhabitants. Later sources asserted that Emperor Tiber Septim altered Cyrodiil's climate upon his apotheosis.

    BLACK MARSH
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Black_Marsh
    Black Marsh is a dense swampland region of southeastern Tamriel, home to the reptilian humanoid race of Argonians and a race of sentient trees known as the Hist. Mer races also use the name Argonia, a reference to an obscure ancient battlefield, to avoid the negative connotations of the term "Black Marsh". Argonians thrive in the foreboding swamps of Black Marsh, a lush and threatening land teeming with poisonous plants and violent predators. The region's tropical climate lends its plants the capacity to overturn all attempts to cultivate them. Foreign agricultural, colonial, and commercial ventures beyond the slave-trade have met with abject failure. The native Argonians organize themselves on the tribal level with success and efficiency, and were only loosely integrated into the ruling Empire.

    ELSWEYR
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Elsweyr
    Elsweyr is a province that lies on the southern coast of Tamriel, and is home to the feline Khajiit. The Khajiiti government is a confederacy held together by the Mane, which are the rarest of the various Khajiit breeds. An important part of Khajiiti culture is the Moon Sugar that is harvested in Elsweyr. Moon Sugar is said to be created by crystallised moonlight falling from the Ja'Kha-jay into the Bay of Topal on the southeastern coast. The waters are then drawn into the sugar plantations of the jungles of Tenmar, which cover much of the southern area of the province.

    HAMMERFELL
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Hammerfell
    Hammerfell, once known as Hegathe, the Deathland, and Volenfell, is a province in the west of Tamriel, bordering Skyrim, Cyrodiil, and High Rock. This province is dominated by the wasteland of the Alik'r desert. It is inhabited by the human race of Redguards, who fled to Tamriel after their home, Yokuda, was destroyed.
    Hammerfell is predominately an urban and maritime province, with most of its population confined to the great port and trade cities. The interior is sparsely populated with small poor farms and beastherds. The Redguards' love of travel, adventure, and the high seas have dispersed them as sailors, mercenaries, and adventurers in ports of call throughout the Empire.

    HIGH ROCK
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:High_Rock
    High Rock is a province in the northwest section of Tamriel. Most of the province is inhabited by the Bretons, who have divided the province into multiple Breton city states and minor kingdoms. The northern tip of central High Rock also contains Orsinium, the City-State of the Orcs. High Rock encompasses the many lands and clans of Greater Betony, the Deselle Isles, the Bjoulsae River tribes, and, by tradition, the Western Reach. The rugged highland strongholds and isolated valley settlements have encouraged the fierce independence of the various local Breton clans, resisting integration into a formal province or Imperial identity. Nonetheless, their language, bardic traditions, and heroic legends are a unifying legacy.

    MORROWIND
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Morrowind
    Morrowind, previously named Dwemereth, Veloth, Resdayn, and Dunmereth, is the province in the northeast corner of Tamriel, and the home of the Dunmer. It is dominated by the large island of Vvardenfell and its centerpiece, the ash-spewing Red Mountain, but also includes territory on the continental mainland. The Inner Sea separates Vvardenfell from the mainland, and the Sea of Ghosts lies to the province's north. Solstheim, an island in this sea near northwestern Morrowind, has not traditionally been associated with any particular province, though Morrowind had long maintained a theoretical claim to it. The Nords of Skyrim conceded the island to Morrowind in 4E 16 following the Red Year, allowing the Dunmer to settle it without contest.

    SKYRIM
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Skyrim
    Skyrim, the northernmost province of Tamriel, is a cold and mountainous region also known as the Old Kingdom, Mereth, or the Fatherland, or Keizaal in the dragon tongue. Many past battles have given it a ravaged appearance and many ruins. Though currently inhabited primarily by Nords, the Elves who they replaced had resided there since time immemorial. The sovereign, the High King of Skyrim, is chosen by the Moot, a convention of jarls. A jarl is a regional ruler chosen through heredity and, rarely, through right of arms. The High King typically rules until death, though acts of dishonor, particularly the appearance of cowardice, can lead to the recall and reconsideration of the Moot. Since the Pact of Chieftains was signed in 1E 420, the Moot does not give serious consideration to anyone but the High King's direct heir unless one is not available.

    SUMMERSET ISLES
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Summerset_Isles
    The Summerset Isles (sometimes spelled Sumurset, Summurset or Sumerset) is a province in southwest Tamriel consisting of fourteen islands of varying size. The three largest and most significant islands are Summerset Isle, Auridon, and Artaeum, the latter of which is apt to disappear for sizable lengths of time without warning. In 4E 22, the Thalmor seized power and renamed the province after its capital, Alinor, though many outside the province still refer to it as Summerset. The current inhabitants of the province are the Altmer, though goblins were there when the elves first arrived. It is believed that the first inhabitants were the Sload before they were driven away by the Aldmer, whom the Altmer claim to be directly descended from.

    VALENWOOD
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Valenwood
    Valenwood is a densely forested, sub-tropical region that encompasses the southwestern coastal plain of Tamriel. In the words of A Pocket Guide to the Empire, Valenwood is "a sea of endless green, a maze of foliage with half-hidden cities growing like blooms from a flower, the home of the Bosmer is Tamriel's garden." One unusual feature of Valenwood is its gigantic, migratory trees, many so large that the Bosmer have built entire cities in their branches. Falinesti is one such tree, a mile-high specimen that serves as the capital of Valenwood and seat of its kings.


    Edited by Sanguiness130 on November 27, 2021 4:55PM
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    PART THREE: RELIGIONS OF TAMRIEL

    It might not be the first thing that comes to mind when creating your roleplay character, but it is relevant to whom your character will associate with, how they will react to certain things and what sort of things they may do or not do in RP. It is VERY important to remember that, like in real life, religion in the Elder Scrolls universe has it's biases, and therefore not all religions in ESO will be widely accepted with the In-Character part of RP. That said all the religion in ESO are there for a reason, and that's because they are practiced in the universe of the Elder Scrolls, so OOCly speaking, no religion is off limits.

    With regards to what and who may or may not dislike certain religious beliefs, I recommend looking into the region a character is from, and what religion they themselves follow. For example, Dunmer do not welcome to worshipping of certain Daedra, whilst an Argonian rejects all teachings of the Divines for that of the Hist, and so on.
    Know your audience!



    DAEDRIC PRINCES
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Daedric_Princes
    Daedric Princes (sometimes referred to as Daedra Lords) are the most powerful of the Daedra, and thus most commonly worshipped as gods. Each has a particular sphere, which it is said to govern. The various Daedric Princes and their spheres are listed below. Daedric Princes may assume a typically masculine or a typically feminine form, sometimes both. They are usually referred to as Princes regardless of what gender they appear most frequently as. In all, there are 17 powerful Princes known to mortals. According to Mankar Camoran, Lorkhan is also a Daedric Prince, although this has never been confirmed.

    Each Daedric Prince, with the exception of Jyggalag, is said to have his own plane of Oblivion, over which they have control. The limits on their planes, powers, and influence are not readily understood, as there are over 37,000 other planes (such as the Soul Cairn and the Chimera of Desolation, as well as chaos realms and pocket realms) over which they exert little or no control.

    The Daedric Princes seem to view Men and Mer as little more than minor amusements, occasionally applauding the actions of mortals when they exceed their expectations. They do not know the mortal sense of "good" and "evil", and usually have extremist tendencies, which is why Men and Mer fear them greatly. However, several princes do seem to take genuine pleasure in tremendous acts of devastation, in particular Boethiah, Molag Bal, Vaermina, Mehrunes Dagon, and Peryite.
    Although the beings are considered evil by most, they are widely worshipped in the realms of Tamriel. Elaborate shrines are created to honor the Daedra as gods. They often take a keen interest in their worshippers, and it is speculated that this is either because of the obvious ego-gratification of being somebody's god, or because the Daedra like to keep an eye on potential future subjects (assuming people of demonic disposition enter Oblivion after death, that is; there are as many afterlife theories as there are religions in the world). Mainstream religious authorities discourage Daedra worship, and often mount witch-hunting expeditions to drive out Daedra worshippers from the local area. During these encounters, they are often surprised at the marginal sanity that comes of worshipping the Daedric Princes. For the most part, however, dealing with the Daedra, one gets the distinct impression of being mused over as a person peering under an upturned rock may momentarily wonder at the lives of the bugs living ignorantly there.

    The list of Daedra and their spheres are as follows;
    • Azura – A Prince who maintains/draws power from the balance of night and day, light and dark.
    • Boethiah – The Prince of deceit, secrecy, conspiracy, treason, and unlawful overthrow of authority.
    • Clavicus Vile – The Prince of deals, pacts, power, bargains, and serenity through wish fulfillment.
    • Hermaeus Mora – The formless Daedric Prince of knowledge and memory, seeks to possess all that is knowable.
    • Hircine – The Prince of the hunt, sport, the Great Game, and the Chase.
    • Jyggalag – The Prince of logical order and deduction, upholds strict order above all else.
    • Malacath – The Prince whose sphere is the patronage of the spurned and ostracized.
    • Mehrunes Dagon – The Prince of destruction, violent upheaval, energy, and mortal ambition.
    • Mephala – The Prince of unknown plots and obfuscation, a master manipulator, a sower of discord.
    • Meridia – The Prince of the energies of all living things, enemy of the undead and all who disrupt the flow of life.
    • Molag Bal – The Prince of domination and spiritual enslavement, seeks to ensnare souls within his domain.
    • Namira – The Prince of the "ancient darkness," the patron of all things considered repulsive.
    • Nocturnal – The Prince of the night and darkness, the patron of all things secretive.
    • Peryite – The Taskmaster, the Daedric Prince of Pestilence, desires order in his domain.
    • Sanguine – The Prince of hedonism, debauchery, and the further indulgences of one's darker nature.
    • Sheogorath – The infamous Prince of Madness, whose motives are unknowable.
    • Vaermina – The Prince of dreams and nightmares, a deliverer of evil omens and dark portents.



    PANTHEONS OF TAMRIEL
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Varieties_of_Faith_in_Tamriel

    It comes to no surprise that different provinces and races within Tamriel have different names for the deities they worship, even if the fundamentals of them are more or less the same.
    Whilst Daedric worship, as written above, is practiced, it is frowned upon in comparison to the religions of the province they reside in.
    Below is a list of the deities worshiped by each race, and any names for such beliefs.

    BRETONS AND IMPERIALS: THE EIGHT
    Akatosh (Dragon God of Time):
    Akatosh is the chief deity of the Eight Divines (the major religious cult of Cyrodiil and its provinces) and one of two deities found in every Tamrielic religion (the other is Lorkhan). He is generally considered to be the first of the gods to form in the Beginning Place. After his establishment, other spirits found the process of being easier, and the various pantheons of the world emerged. He embodies the qualities of endurance, invincibility, and everlasting legitimacy.

    Kynareth (Goddess of Air):
    Kynareth is a member of the Eight Divines, the strongest of the Sky spirits, patron of sailors and travelers. In some legends, she is the first to agree to Lorkhan's plan to invent the mortal plane, and she provides the space for its creation in the void. She is also associated with rain, a phenomenon said not to occur before the removal of Lorkhan's divine spark.

    Julianos (God of Wisdom and Logic):
    Often associated with Jhunal, the Nord father of language and mathematics, Julianos is the god of literature, law, history, and contradiction, and the favorite deity of most Breton mages.

    Dibella (Goddess of Beauty):
    Popular god of the Eight Divines, Dibella has nearly a dozen different cults, some devoted to women, some to artists and aesthetics, and others to erotic instruction.

    Arkay (God of the Cycle of Life and Death):
    Member of the Eight Divines pantheon and popular elsewhere, as well. Arkay is often more important in those cultures where his father, Akatosh, is either less related to time or where his time aspects are difficult to comprehend by the common folk. He is the god of burials and funeral rites, and is sometimes associated with the seasons. His priests are staunch opponents of necromancy and all forms of the undead. It is said that Arkay did not exist before the world was created by the gods under Lorkhan's supervision/urging/trickery. Therefore, he is sometimes called the Mortals' God.

    Zenithar (God of Work and Commerce, Trader God):
    Member of the Eight Divines, Zenithar is understandably associated with the Bosmeri Z'en. In High Rock, however, he is a far more cultivated god of merchants, artisans, and the middle nobility. His worshipers say, despite his mysterious origins, Zenithar is the god "that will always win."

    Mara (Goddess of Love):
    Nearly universal goddess. Her origins started in mythic times as a fertility goddess; in High Rock, she is the Mother-Goddess. She is sometimes associated with Nir of the "Anuad," the female principle of the cosmos that gave birth to creation. For the Bretons, she is married to Akatosh.

    Stendarr (God of Mercy):
    God of the Eight Divines, Stendarr has evolved from his Nord origins into a deity of compassion, or sometimes, righteous rule. Stendarr is the patron of magistrates, rulers, and knights errant.


    Additional Deities with Significant Breton Cults:

    Magnus (Magus):
    The god of sorcery, Magnus withdrew from the creation of the world at the last second, though it cost him dearly. What remains of him is felt and controlled by mortals as magic. One story says that, while the idea was thought up by Lorkhan, it was Magnus who created the schematics and diagrams needed to construct the mortal plane. He is sometimes represented by a golden eye, an astrolabe, a telescope, or more commonly, a staff. Legends say he can inhabit the bodies of powerful magicians and lend them his power.

    Y'ffre (God of the Forest):
    While Akatosh Time Dragon might be the king of the gods, Y'ffre is revered as the spirit of "the now." According to the Elves, after the creation of the mortal plane, everything was in chaos. The first mortals were turning into plants and animals and back again. Then Y'ffre transformed himself into the first of the Ehlnofey, or "Earth Bones." After the laws of nature were established, mortals had a semblance of safety in the new world, because they could finally understand it.

    Sheor (Bad Man):
    In High Rock, the Bad Man is the source of all strife. He seems to have started as the god of crop failure, but most modern theologians agree that he is a demonized version of the Nordic Shor or Aldmeri Lorkhan, born during the dark years after the fall of Saarthal.

    Phynaster:
    Hero-god who taught the Altmer how to naturally live another hundred years by using a shorter walking stride. Patron deity and "teacher" of the Direnni. Often worshiped by those Breton mages who emphasize their Elven blood.



    CROWN REDGUARDS: EIGHT OF THE CROWNS
    Satakal (The Worldskin):
    Yokudan god of everything, a fusion of the concepts of Anu and Padomay. Basically, Satakal is much like the Nords' Alduin, who destroys one world to begin the next. In Yokudan mythology, Satakal had done (and still does) this many times over, a cycle which prompted the birth of spirits that could survive the transition. These spirits ultimately become the Yokudan pantheon. Popular god among the Crowns of the Alik'r nomads.

    Ruptga (Tall Papa):
    Chief deity of the Yokudan pantheon. Ruptga, more commonly "Tall Papa," was the first god to figure out how to survive the Hunger of Satakal. Following his lead, the other gods learned the "Walkabout," or a process by which they can persist beyond one lifetime. Tall Papa set the stars in the sky to show lesser spirits how to do this, too. When there were too many spirits to keep track of, though, Ruptga created a helper out the dead skin of past worlds. This helper is Sep (see below), who later creates the world of mortals.

    Tu'whacca (Tricky God):
    Yokudan god of souls. Tu'whacca, before the creation of the world, was the god of Nobody Really Cares. When Tall Papa undertook the creation of the Walkabout, Tu'whacca found a purpose; he became the caretaker of the Far Shores, and continues to help Redguards find their way into the afterlife.

    Zeht (God of Farms):
    Yokudan god of agriculture who renounced his father after the world was created, which is why Tall Papa makes it so hard to grow food.

    Morwha (Teat God):
    Yokudan fertility goddess, fundamental deity in the Yokudan pantheon, and the favorite of Tall Papa's wives. Still worshiped in various areas of Hammerfell, including Stros M'kai, Morwha is always portrayed as four-armed, so that she can "grab more husbands."

    Tava (Bird God):
    Yokudan spirit of the air. Tava is most famous for leading the Yokudans to the isle of Herne after the destruction of their homeland. She has since become assimilated into the mythology of Kynareth. She is still very popular in Hammerfell among sailors, and her shrines can be found in most port cities.

    Onsi (War God; Boneshaver):
    Notable warrior god of the Yokudan Ra Gada, Onsi taught Mankind how to pull their knives into swords.

    Diagna (Orichalc God of the Sideways Blade):
    Hoary thuggish cult of the Redguards that originated in Yokuda during the Twenty-Seven Snake Folk Slaughter. Diagna was an avatar of the HoonDing (the Yokudan God of Make Way, see below) that achieved permanence. He was instrumental to the defeat of the Lefthanded Elves, as he brought orichalc weapons to the Yokudan people to win the fight. In Tamriel, he led a very tight-knit group of followers against the Orcs of Orsinium during the height of their ancient power.


    Additional Deities with Significant Redguard Cults:

    Leki (Saint of the Spirit Sword):
    Daughter of Tall Papa, Leki is the goddess of aberrant swordsmanship. The Na-Totambu of Yokuda warred to a standstill during the mythic era to decide who would lead the charge against the Lefthanded Elves. Their swordmasters, though, were so skilled in the Best Known Cuts as to be matched evenly. Leki introduced the Ephemeral Feint. Afterwards, a victor emerged and the war with the Aldmer began.

    HoonDing (The Make Way God):
    Yokudan spirit of "perseverance over infidels." The HoonDing has historically materialized whenever the Redguards need to "make way" for their people. In Tamrielic history this has only happened twice, in the First Era during the Ra Gada invasion.

    Malooc (Horde King):
    An enemy god of the Ra Gada who led the Goblins against the Redguards during the First Era. Fled east when the army of the HoonDing overtook his Goblin hordes.

    Sep (The Snake):
    Yokudan version of Lorkhan. Sep is born when Tall Papa creates someone to help him regulate the spirit trade. Sep, though, is driven crazy by the hunger of Satakal, and he convinces some of the gods to help him make an easier alternative to the Walkabout. This, of course, is the world as we know it, and the spirits who followed Sep become trapped here, to live out their lives as mortals. Sep is punished by Tall Papa for his transgressions, but his hunger lives on as a void in the stars, a "non-space" that tries to upset mortal entry into the Far Shores.



    DUNMER: THE TRIBUNAL AND THE GOOD DAEDRA

    The Dunmer are descended from the Chimer, who were apostates of the Aldmeri's Aedra worship. As the Alessian Reforms never took hold in Morrowind, their pantheon bears little resemblance to the rest of Tamriel. The Dark Elves' original religion was worship of several Daedric Princes, the so-called "Good Daedra," but that has been largely superseded by reverence for the "Living Gods" of the Tribunal.
    THE TRIBUNAL

    Almalexia (Mother Morrowind):
    Most traces of Auri-El disappeared from ancient Chimer legends during their so-called "exodus," primarily due to that god's association and esteem with the Altmeri. However, most aspects of Auri-El that seem so important to the mortal races—namely immortality, historicity, and genealogy—have conveniently resurfaced in Almalexia, the most popular of Morrowind's divine Tribunal.

    Vivec (Master of Morrowind):
    Warrior-poet god of the Dunmer. Vivec is the invisible keeper of the holy land, ever vigilant against the dark gods of the Volcano. He/she has saved the Dunmeri people from certain death on numerous occasions.

    Sotha Sil (Mystery of Morrowind):
    God of the Dunmer, Sotha Sil is the least known of the divine Tribunal. He is said to be reshaping the world from his hidden, clockwork city.
    THE GOOD DAEDRA

    Boethiah (Prince of Plots):
    Heralded by the Prophet Veloth, Boethiah is the original god-ancestor of the Dark Elves. Through his/her illuminations, the eventual "Chimer," or Changed Folk, renounced all ties to the Aldmer and founded a new nation based on Daedric principles. All manner of Dark Elven cultural "advances" are attributed to Boethiah, from philosophy to magic to "responsible" architecture. Ancient Velothi allegories are uniformly heroic successes of Boethiah over enemies of every type, serving as foundation stories of Chimeri struggle. Also known as the Anticipation of Almalexia.

    Mephala (Androgyne):
    Mephala is the Webspinner or Spider God. In Morrowind, he/she was the ancestor who taught the Chimer the skills they would need to evade their enemies or murder them in secret. Enemies were numerous in those days, since the Chimer were a small faction. He/she, along with Boethiah, organized the clan systems that eventually became the basis for the Great Houses. He/she founded the Morag Tong. Also called the Anticipation of Vivec.

    Azura (Goddess of Dusk and Dawn):
    Azura was the god-ancestor who taught the Chimer the mysteries needed to be different than the Altmer. Some of her more conventional teachings are sometimes attributed to Boethiah. In the stories, Azura is often more a communal cosmic force for the race as a whole than an ancestor or a god. Also known as the Anticipation of Sotha Sil.
    Lorkhan (The Missing God):
    This Creator-Trickster-Tester deity is in every Tamrielic mythic tradition. His most popular name is the Aldmeri "Lorkhan" or Doom Drum. He convinced or contrived the Original Spirits to bring about the creation of the mortal plane. This upset the status quo, much like his father, Padomay, who introduced instability into the universe in the Beginning Place. After the world is materialized, Lorkhan is separated from his divine center, sometimes involuntarily, and eventually wanders the creation of the et'Ada. He and his metaphysical placement in the "scheme of things" is interpreted a variety of ways. In Morrowind, he is a being related to the Psijic Endeavor, a process by which mortals are charged with transcending the gods that created them.
    FOUR CORNERS OF THE HOUSE OF TROUBLES ("THE TESTING GODS")
    Enemy gods, more to be placated and appeased than worshiped.

    Molag Bal (God of Schemes, Lord of Brutality):
    Daedric power of much importance in Morrowind. There, he is always the archenemy of Boethiah, the Prince of Plots. He is the main source of the obstacles to the Dunmer (and preceding Chimer) people. In legends, Molag Bal always tries to upset the bloodlines of Great Houses or otherwise ruin Dunmeri "purity." A race of supermonsters, said to live in Molag Amur, are the result of his seduction of Vivec during the previous era.

    Malacath (God of Curses):
    In Dunmer myth, Boethiah swallowed Aldmer hero-god Trinimac and excreted him as Malacath. A somewhat weak but vengeful Daedra, the Dark Elves say he is also Malak, the god-king of the Orcs. He always tests the Dunmer for physical weakness.

    Sheogorath (The Mad God):
    The fearful obeisance of Sheogorath is widespread, and it is found in most Tamrielic quarters. Contemporary sources indicate that his roots are in Aldmeri creation stories; therein, he is "born" when Lorkhan's divine spark is removed. One crucial myth calls him the "Sithis-shaped hole" of the world. He tests the Dunmer for mental weakness and tempts the Great Houses into treachery against each other.

    Mehrunes Dagon (God of Destruction):
    Popular Daedric power. He is associated with natural dangers like fire, earthquakes, and floods. In some cultures, Dagon is merely a god of bloodshed and betrayal. He is an especially important deity in Morrowind, where he represents its near-inhospitable terrain.



    REDGUARDS: THE EIGHT OF FOREBEARS

    The Forebears, who have been longest in Tamriel and had the stronger relationship with the Second Empire, worship substantially the same pantheon as the Imperials and Bretons, whereas the more conservative Crowns still revere the ancient Yokudan gods.
    Akatosh (Dragon God of Time):
    Akatosh is the chief deity of the Eight Divines (the major religious cult of Cyrodiil and its provinces), and one of two deities found in every Tamrielic religion (the other is Lorkhan). He is generally considered to be the first of the Gods to form in the Beginning Place; after his establishment, other spirits found the process of being easier and the various pantheons of the world emerged. He embodies the qualities of endurance, invincibility, and everlasting legitimacy.

    Tava (Bird God):
    Yokudan spirit of the air. Tava is most famous for leading the Yokudans to the isle of Herne after the destruction of their homeland. She has since become assimilated into the mythology of Kynareth, and is often worshiped by the Forebears in that name. She is very popular in Hammerfell among sailors, and her shrines can be found in most port cities.

    Julianos (God of Wisdom and Logic):
    Often associated with Jhunal, the Nords' father of language and mathematics, Julianos is the god of literature, law, history, and contradiction, and is thus the patron of magistrates (and wizards).

    Dibella (Goddess of Beauty):
    Popular god of the Eight Divines. She has nearly a dozen different cults, some devoted to women, some to artists and aesthetics, and others to erotic instruction.

    Tu'whacca (Tricky God):
    Yokudan god of souls. Tu'whacca, before the creation of the world, was the god of Nobody Really Cares. When Tall Papa undertook the creation of the Walkabout, Tu'whacca found a purpose; he became the caretaker of the Far Shores, and continues to help Redguards find their way into the afterlife. His cult is sometimes associated with Arkay in the more cosmopolitan regions of Hammerfell, and he is often worshiped in that name by Forebears.

    Zeht (God of Farms):
    Yokudan god of agriculture who renounced his father after the world was created, which is why Akatosh makes it so hard to grow food. Analogous to Zenithar, and sometimes worshiped in that name.

    Morwha (Teat God):
    Yokudan fertility goddess. Fundamental deity in the Yokudan pantheon, and the favorite of Tall Papa's wives. Still worshiped in various areas of Hammerfell, including Stros M'kai. Morwha is always portrayed as four-armed, so that she can "grab more husbands." Analogous to Mara, and sometimes worshiped in that name by the Forebears.

    Stendarr (God of Mercy):
    Stendarr's sphere includes compassion, charity, justice, and righteous rule, and is the favorite god of Redguard "gallants" (knights).


    Additional Deities with Significant Redguard Cults:

    Leki (Saint of the Spirit Sword):
    Divine daughter of Tall Papa, Leki is the goddess of aberrant swordsmanship. The Na-Totambu of Yokuda warred to a standstill during the mythic era to decide who would lead the charge against the Lefthanded Elves. Their swordmasters, though, were so skilled in the Best Known Cuts as to be matched evenly. Leki introduced the Ephemeral Feint. Afterwards, a victor emerged and the war with the Aldmer began.

    HoonDing (The Make Way God):
    Yokudan spirit of "perseverance over infidels." The HoonDing has historically materialized whenever the Redguards need to "make way" for their people. In Tamrielic history this has only happened twice, in the First Era during the Ra Gada invasion.

    Malooc (Horde King):
    An enemy god of the Ra Gada who led the Goblins against the Redguards during the First Era. Fled east when the army of the HoonDing overtook his Goblin hordes.

    Sep (The Snake):
    Yokudan version of Lorkhan. Sep is born when Tall Papa creates someone to help him regulate the spirit trade. Sep, though, is driven crazy by the hunger of Satakal, and he convinces some of the gods to help him make an easier alternative to the Walkabout. This, of course, is the world as we know it, and the spirits who followed Sep become trapped here, to live out their lives as mortals. Sep is punished by Tall Papa for his transgressions, but his hunger lives on as a void in the stars, a "non-space" that tries to upset mortal entry into the Far Shores.



    ARGONIANS
    Except for a few of the most assimilated, Argonians worship neither Aedra nor Daedra. They do not have "religion" as it is known elsewhere in Tamriel. They are known to venerate the Hist trees of Black Marsh, but they do not appear to have prayers, priests, or temples.

    Argonians also venerate Sithis, the primordial Shadow/Chaos that existed before the gods were born. Unlike most citizens of Tamriel, they do not regard Sithis as "evil." In fact, Argonians born under the sign of the Shadow are taken at birth and presented to the Dark Brotherhood, which in Black Marsh is considered an integral part of society.



    ALTMER: THE EIGHT
    (though few Altmer outside the Empire accept the limitation of Divines to eight):
    Auri-El (King of the Aldmer):
    The Elven Akatosh is Auri-El. Auri-El is the soul of Anui-El, who, in turn, is the soul of Anu the Everything. He is the chief of most Aldmeri pantheons. Most Altmeri and Bosmeri claim direct descent from Auri-El. In his only known moment of weakness, he agreed to take his part in the creation of the mortal plane, that act which forever sundered the Elves from the spirit worlds of eternity. To make up for it, Auri-El led the original Aldmer against the armies of Lorkhan in mythic times, vanquishing that tyrant and establishing the first kingdoms of the Altmer, Altmora and Old Ehlnofey. He then ascended to heaven in full observance of his followers so that they might learn the steps needed to escape the mortal plane.

    Magnus (Magus):
    The god of sorcery, Magnus withdrew from the creation of the world at the last second, though it cost him dearly. What is left of him on the world is felt and controlled by mortals as magic. One story says that, while the idea was thought up by Lorkhan, it was Magnus who created the schematics and diagrams needed to construct the mortal plane. He is sometimes represented by an astrolabe, a telescope, or, more commonly, a staff.

    Trinimac:
    Strong god of the early Aldmer, in some places more popular than Auri-El. He was a warrior spirit of the original Elven tribes that led armies against the Men. Boethiah is said to have assumed his shape (in some stories, he even eats Trinimac) so that he could convince a throng of Aldmer to listen to him, which led to their eventual Chimeri conversion. Trinimac vanishes from the mythic stage after this, to return as the dread Malacath (Altmeri propaganda portrays this as the dangers of Dunmeri influence).

    Y'ffre (God of the Forest):
    While Auri-El Time Dragon might be the king of the gods, Y'ffre is revered as the spirit of "the now." According to the Elves, after the creation of the mortal plane everything was in chaos. The first mortals were turning into plants and animals and back again. Then Y'ffre transformed himself into the first of the Ehlnofey, or "Earth Bones." After these laws of nature were established, mortals had a semblance of safety in the new world, because they could finally understand it.

    Xarxes:
    Xarxes is the god of ancestry and secret knowledge. He began as a scribe to Auri-El, and has kept track of all Aldmeri accomplishments, large and small, since the beginning of time. He created his wife, Oghma, from his favorite moments in history.

    Mara (Goddess of Love):
    Nearly universal goddess. Origins started in mythic times as a fertility goddess. She is sometimes associated with Nir of the "Anuad," the female principle of the cosmos that gave birth to creation. For the Altmer, she is the wife of Auri-El.

    Stendarr (God of Mercy):
    God of compassion and righteous rule. In early Altmeri legends, Stendarr is the apologist of Men.

    Syrabane (Warlock's God):
    An Aldmeri god-ancestor of magic, Syrabane aided Bendu Olo in the Fall of the Sload. Through judicious use of his magical ring, Syrabane saved many from the scourge of the Thrassian Plague. He is also called the Apprentices' God, for he is a favorite of the younger members of the Mages Guild.


    Additional Deities with Significant Altmer Cults:

    Phynaster:
    Hero-god of the Summerset Isles, who taught the Altmer how to naturally live another hundred years by using a shorter walking stride.

    Lorkhan (The Missing God):
    This Creator-Trickster-Tester deity is in every Tamrielic mythic tradition. His most popular name is the Aldmeri "Lorkhan," or Doom Drum. He convinced or contrived the Original Spirits to bring about the creation of the mortal plane, upsetting the status quo—much like his father Padomay had introduced instability into the universe in the Beginning Place. After the world is materialized, Lorkhan is separated from his divine center, sometimes involuntarily, and wanders the creation of the et'Ada. He and his metaphysical placement in the "scheme of things" is interpreted a variety of ways. To the High Elves, he is the most unholy of all higher powers, as he forever broke their connection to the spirit plane. In the legends, he is almost always an enemy of the Aldmer and, therefore, a hero of early Mankind.



    KHAJIIT: THE EIGHT
    Alkosh (Dragon King of Cats):
    Pre-ri'Datta Dynasty Anequinine deity. A variation on the Altmeri Auri-El, and thus an Akatosh-as-culture-hero for the earliest Khajiit. His worship was co-opted during the establishment of the Riddle'Thar, and he still enjoys immense popularity in Elsweyr's wasteland regions. He is depicted as a fearsome dragon, a creature the Khajiit say "is just a real big cat." He repelled an early Aldmeri pogrom of Pelinal Whitestrake during mythic times.

    Riddle'Thar (Two-Moons Dance):
    The cosmic order deity of the Khajiit, the Riddle'Thar was revealed to Elsweyr by the prophet Rid-Thar-ri'Datta, the Mane. The Riddle'Thar is more a set of guidelines by which to live than a single entity, but some of his avatars like to appear as humble messengers of the gods. Also known as the Sugar God.

    Jone and Jode (Little Moon God and Big Moon God):
    Together, the moons represent duality, fate, and luck. In Khajiiti religion, Jone and Jode are aspects of the Lunar Lattice, or ja-Kha'jay.

    Mara (Mother Cat):
    Nearly universal goddess. Originally a fertility goddess, the Khajiit associate her with Nir of the "Anuad," the female principle of the cosmos. She is the lover of Alkosh.

    S'rendarr (The Runt; God of Mercy):
    S'rendarr's sphere includes compassion, charity, and justice. In early Aldmeri legends, S'rendarr is the apologist of Men.

    Khenarthi (God of Winds):
    Khenarthi is the strongest of the Sky spirits. In some legends, he is the first to agree to Lorkhaj's plan to invent the mortal plane, and provides the space for its creation in the void. He is also associated with rain, a phenomenon said not to occur before the removal of Lorkhaj's divine spark.

    Baan Dar (The Bandit God):
    In most regions, Baan Dar is a marginal deity, a trickster spirit of thieves and beggars. In Elsweyr he is more important, and is regarded as the Pariah. In this aspect, Baan Dar becomes the cleverness or desperate genius of the long-suffering Khajiit, whose last-minute plans always upset the machinations of their (Elven or Human) enemies. He has also lent his name to the Baandari Pedlars, the traveling Khajiiti merchant tribe.


    Additional Deities with Significant Khajiiti Cults:

    Magrus (Cat's Eye, Sun God):
    Khajiiti version of Magnus, the god of the sun and sorcery, popular with Khajiiti magicians (though less so than Azurah).

    Rajhin (The Footpad):
    Thief and trickster god, the Purring Liar, much beloved of Khajiiti storytellers. Rajhin grew up in the Black Kiergo section of Senchal. The most famous burglar in Elsweyr's history, Rajhin is said to have stolen a tattoo from the neck of Empress Kintyra as she slept.

    Azurah (Goddess of Dusk and Dawn):
    Patron of Khajiiti magicians, respected rather than feared for her sometime trickery. In myth she is tied into the origins of Khajiiti out of Aldmeri stock.

    Sheggorath (Skooma Cat, the Mad God):
    The King of Insanity appeals to the darker side of the Cat-Men, who chafe at the strictures of sanity and responsibility.

    Hircine (Hungry Cat):
    God of hunting and skinchanging, revered for his fierceness and cunning.

    Sangiin (Blood Cat):
    God of Death and Secret Murder, Sangiin's worship is hidden from Cat's Eye. "For who can control the urges of blood?"

    Namiira (The Great Darkness):
    An enemy of the living, to be placated rather than worshiped.

    Lorkhaj (Moon Beast):
    Pre-ri'Datta Dynasty Anequinine deity, easily identified with the Missing God, Lorkhan. This Creator-Trickster-Tester deity is in every Tamrielic mythic tradition. He convinced or contrived the Original Spirits to bring about the creation of the mortal plane, upsetting the status quo—much like his father Padomay had introduced instability into the universe in the Beginning Place. After the world is materialized, Lorkhaj is separated from his divine center, sometimes involuntarily, and wanders the creation of the et'Ada. He and his metaphysical placement in the "scheme of things" is interpreted a variety of ways. In the legends, he is almost always an enemy of the Aldmer and, therefore, a hero of early Mankind.



    NORDS: THE EIGHT
    Shor (King of the Gods):
    Shor is the Nordic version of Lorkhan. He sided with men after the creation of the world. Foreign gods (i.e., elven ones) conspired against him to bring about his defeat, dooming him to the "underworld". Atmoran myths depict him as a bloodthirsty warrior king who repeatedly led the Nords to victory over their Aldmeri oppressors. Before his doom, Shor, sometimes also called the Children's God, was chief of the gods. It is believed Shor can be found at Sovngarde, an Aetherial utopia he built which is open in the afterlife to all Nords who prove their mettle or die valiantly in battle. Though dead, ancient Nordic legends speak of Shor's ghost being "sung" back into the world at momentous occasions in Nordic history.

    Kyne (Kiss at the End):
    Nord Goddess of the Storm. Widow of Shor and favored god of warriors, she is often called the Mother of Men. Her daughters taught the first Nords the use of the Thu'um or "Storm Voice."

    Mara (Goddess of Love):
    For the Nords, Mara is a handmaiden of Kyne and concubine of Shor. As the goddess of fertility and agriculture, she's sometimes associated with Nir of the "Anuad," the female principle of the cosmos that gave birth to creation.

    Dibella (Goddess of Beauty):
    Popular god of the Eight Divines. She has nearly a dozen different cults, some devoted to women, some to artists and aesthetics, and others to erotic instruction.

    Stuhn (God of Ransom):
    Nord precursor to Stendarr, brother of Tsun, shield-thane of Shor. Stuhn was a warrior god who fought against the Aldmeri pantheon. He showed Men how to take (and the benefits of taking) prisoners of war.

    Jhunal (Rune God):
    God of knowledge and hermetic orders, precursor of Julianos. Never very popular among the mercurial and warlike Nords, his worship is fading.

    Shor (God of the Underworld):
    The Nord version of Lorkhan, Shor allied with Men after the creation of the world. Foreign gods (that is, Elven ones) conspired against him and brought about his defeat, dooming him to the afterlife, Sovngarde. Atmoran myths depict him as a bloodthirsty warrior king who led the Nords to victory over their Aldmeri oppressors time and again. Before his doom, Shor was the chief of the gods. He is sometimes called the Children's God (see "Orkey.") Considered a "dead god," Shor has no priesthood and is not actively worshiped, but he is frequently sworn by.

    Orkey (Old Knocker):
    God of mortality, Orkey combines aspects of Mauloch and Arkay. He is a "loan-god" for the Nords, who seem to have taken up his worship during Aldmeri rule of Atmora. Nords believe they once lived as long as Elves until Orkey appeared, through [sic] heathen trickery, he fooled them into a bargain that "bound them to the count of winters." At one time, legends say, Nords only had a lifespan of six years due to Orkey's foul magic. Then Shor showed up and, through unknown means, removed the curse, throwing most of it onto the nearby Orcs.

    Alduin (The World-Eater):
    Alduin is the Nord variation of Akatosh. He only superficially resembles his counterpart in the Imperial Eight Divines. For example, Alduin's sobriquet, "the World Eater," comes from myths that depict him as the horrible, ravaging firestorm that destroyed the last world to begin this one. Nords therefore see the god of time as both creator and harbinger of the apocalypse. He is not the chief of the Nord pantheon (in fact, this pantheon has no chief, see "Shor") but its wellspring, albeit a grim and frightening one.
    Alduin destroyed the last world to enable the creation of this one, and he will destroy this one to enable the next. Alduin was once worshiped by the long-dead Dragon Cult, but that has been outlawed for centuries, so Alduin has no admitted worshipers.


    Testing Gods

    Herma-Mora (The Woodland Man):
    Ancient Atmoran "Demon of Knowledge" who nearly seduced the Nords into becoming Aldmer. Most Ysgramor myths are about escaping the wiles of old Herma-Mora. Unlike his Bosmeri adherents, the Nords don't deny his Daedric nature.

    Mauloch (God of Orcs, "Mountain Fart"):
    Clearly identified for the Nords with the Daedric Prince Malacath, Mauloch tests them through warfare. Mauloch troubled the heirs of King Harald for a long time. Fleeing east after his defeat at the Battle of Dragon Wall, ca. 1E 660, his rage was said to fill the sky with his sulfurous hatred, earning that year the sobriquet "Year of Winter in Summer."


    Dead God

    Tsun:
    Extinct Nord god of trials against adversity. Died defending Shor from foreign gods.



    ORCS: MALACATH AND TRINIMAC
    The Orcs acknowledge the existence of many other gods, but they worship only one:

    Malacath, or Mauloch (Orc-Father, The Great Chief):
    Orcs revere Mauloch as the First Orc, and live by the Code of Mauloch, which dictates such matters as honor and vengeance.
    The Code of Mauloch
    The Code is more often tacit than explicit, but includes the following:

    — Respect for forging and blacksmithing.
    — The traditional roles of a clan's chief and his wives.
    — The tradition of selection of a new chief through challenge and combat.
    — The custom that one who commits a crime must pay "Blood Price" to the victim (or victim's relatives).
    — The requirement that insults to honor must be avenged.
    — Recognition that to die in combat pleases Mauloch.


    The Cult of Trinimac
    Many Orcs believe in the origin myth in which the Elven god Trinimac was eaten by Boethiah, and when he was excreted he was transformed into Malacath, and all his followers into Orcs. Those who believe in this Elven origin of Orc-kind often call them "Orsimer."

    Some Orcs therefore venerate Trinimac as their god-ancestor rather than Malacath. Orcs of the Trinimac cult insist that Trinimac fooled Boethiah into believing he was corrupted by his passage through Boethiah, when he in fact absorbed some of Boethiah's strength and passed it on to his followers. In this way the Orsimer can be seen as "improved Elves."



    BOSMER: THE EIGHT
    Auri-El (King of the Aldmer):
    The Elven Akatosh is Auri-El. Auri-El is the soul of Anui-El, who, in turn, is the soul of Anu the Everything. He is the chief of most Aldmeri pantheons. Most Altmeri and Bosmeri claim direct descent from Auri-El. In his only known moment of weakness, he agreed to take his part in the creation of the mortal plane, that act which forever sundered the Elves from the spirit worlds of eternity. To make up for it, Auri-El led the original Aldmer against the armies of Lorkhan in mythic times, vanquishing that tyrant and establishing the first kingdoms of the Aldmer, Altmora and Old Ehlnofey. He then ascended to heaven in full observance of his followers so that they might learn the steps needed to escape the mortal plane.

    Y'ffre (God of the Forest):
    Most important deity of the Bosmeri pantheon. While Auri-El the Time Dragon might be the king of the gods, the Bosmer revere Y'ffre as the spirit of "the now." According to the Wood Elves, after the creation of the mortal plane everything was in chaos. The first mortals were turning into plants and animals and back again. Then Y'ffre transformed himself into the first of the Ehlnofey, or "Earth Bones." After these laws of nature were established, mortals had a semblance of safety in the new world, because they could finally understand it. Y'ffre is sometimes called the Storyteller, for the lessons he taught the first Bosmer. Some Bosmer still possess the knowledge of the chaos times, which they can use to great effect (the Wild Hunt).

    Arkay (God of the Cycle of Life and Death):
    Arkay is the god of burials and funeral rites, and is sometimes associated with the seasons. His priests are staunch opponents of necromancy and all forms of the undead. It is said that Arkay did not exist before the world was created by the gods under Lorkhan's supervision/urging/trickery. Therefore, he is sometimes called the Mortals' God.

    Xarxes:
    Xarxes is the god of ancestry and secret knowledge. He began as a scribe to Auri-El, and has kept track of all Aldmeri accomplishments, large and small, since the beginning of time. He created his wife, Oghma, from his favorite moments in history.

    Mara (Goddess of Love):
    Nearly universal goddess. Origins started in mythic times as a fertility goddess. She is sometimes associated with Nir of the "Anuad," the female principle of the cosmos that gave birth to creation. For the Bosmer, she is the wife of Auri-El.

    Stendarr (God of Mercy):
    God of compassion and righteous rule. In early Aldmeri legends, Stendarr is the apologist of Men.

    Z'en (God of Toil):
    Bosmeri god of payment in kind, which includes both just remuneration and retribution. Studies indicate origins in both Argonian and Akaviri mythologies, perhaps introduced into Valenwood by Kothringi sailors. Ostensibly an agriculture deity, Z'en sometimes proves to be an entity of a much higher cosmic order.

    Baan Dar (The Bandit God):
    Trickster spirit of thieves and beggars borrowed from the Khajiit.


    Additional Deities with Significant Bosmeri Cults:

    Herma-Mora (The Woodland Man):
    Malicious trickster spirit (another one!) whose Bosmeri cultists say is not to be confused with the Daedra Hermaeus Mora. (Others deride this assertion.)

    Jone and Jode (Little Moon God and Big Moon God):
    Aldmeri gods of the Moons, they are spirits of fortune, both good and bad.

    Hircine (The Huntsman, Father of Manbeasts):
    Master of the Great Hunt and lord of all lycanthropes. Worshipers of Hircine are not as ruthless as those who worship other Daedra; they always give their prey at least a small chance to escape.

    Lorkhan (The Missing God):
    This Creator-Trickster-Tester deity is in every Tamrielic mythic tradition. His most popular name is the Aldmeri "Lorkhan," or Doom Drum. He convinced or contrived the Original Spirits to bring about the creation of the mortal plane, upsetting the status quo—much like his father Padomay had introduced instability into the universe in the Beginning Place. After the world is materialized, Lorkhan is separated from his divine center, sometimes involuntarily, and wanders the creation of the et'Ada. He and his metaphysical placement in the "scheme of things" is interpreted a variety of ways. To the Elves, he is the most unholy of all higher powers, as he forever broke their connection to the spirit plane. In the legends, he is almost always an enemy of the Aldmer and, therefore, a hero of early Mankind.


    Edited by Sanguiness130 on November 27, 2021 5:25PM
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    PART FOUR: GUILDS


    Fighters Guild
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Fighters_Guild

    The Fighters Guild, present across most of Tamriel, provides a common and, more importantly, public place of training, study, and employment for those of a martial persuasion. The guild is a professional organization chartered by the Emperor to regulate the hiring and training of mercenaries, protect commerce, capture or drive away beasts, and similar security duties.
    Guild halls can take on a contract from any citizen, provided it does not conflict with the laws or customs of the region, and Guild Stewards are entrusted with receiving and dispensing contracts to Guild members, hearing complaints about servicing of said contracts, promotions, and determining eligibility for members.
    During the time of the Planemeld, they were contracted to destroy Dark Anchors sent to Tamriel by Molag Bal, the guild master at this time had ties to the Daedric Prince Meridia, and as such this was reflected with the highest-ranking members having the ability to briefly summon Dawnbreaker. However, once the Planemeld was halted by the Vestige, they had fulfilled the terms of their contract and no longer had granted abilities by Meridia.


    Mages Guild
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Mages_Guild

    The Mages Guild, also known as the Guild of Mages, is a professional organization, once located throughout Tamriel, that was dedicated to the study and application of magicka and alchemy.
    The Mages Guild was led by an Arch-Mage, and guided by the Council of Mages, made up of six Archmagisters (one of them the Arch-Mage). The Council decided important Guild policies, such as its policy on the use of Necromancy and also administered recruitment, sale of spells in each local Guild Hall, and the enforcement of Guild law. The rules of the Guild varied from location to location, some differences more drastic than others. In addition, Guild Halls existed in most cities in Tamriel, each of which was run by a local Guild Magister (alternatively known as a Hall Magister). Below them were the Master of Incunabula (alternatively called the High Incunabulist) and the Master at Arms. The Master of Incunabula had a counsel of two, the Master of Academia and the Master of the Scrye. The Master at Arms also had a counsel, the Master of Initiates and the Palatinus (the leader of the local chapter of the Order of the Lamp).
    Its charter from the Emperor specified that the guild must provide magic services to the public. Anyone could purchase potions, alchemical ingredients, magical items, and a selection of standard spells from the guild. However, training, goods, and services were cheaper for members, and the guild stewards were sometimes able to provide members with work. Furthermore, exclusive services such as spell-making and enchanting, deemed potentially dangerous to the public at large, were only made available to higher-ranked guild members in good standing. The guild also has rules about fraternization and lewd advances.


    Psijic Order
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Psijic_Order

    The Psijic Order or Psijics is the oldest monastic group of Tamriel, devoted to the study and practice of Mysticism, which they call the "Old Ways" or "Elder Way". They make their home on the Isle of Artaeum that once dwelled in the Summerset archipelago.
    The Psijic Order chooses its members "by a complex, ritualized method not understood by the common people." The majority of the order are Altmer, but they do recruit members of the other races with powerful magic talent. Even though the Psijics are extremely reclusive, members of the Order can usually be recognized by their distinctive clothing; though their exact garb has changed over their history. They once wore clothing which gave them the nickname "grey cloaks," and in the Second Era they were seen with blue and gold clothing. The Psijics are governed by a body known as the Council of Artaeum. The Council is led by a single Psijic who can hold various titles, including Ritemaster, or Loremaster.


    Thieves Guild
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Thieves_Guild

    The Thieves Guild is dedicated to the gathering and training of those who are stealthy and shadowy in nature. Although criminal by its very definition, for untold years, local authorities in places throughout Tamriel have tolerated the existence of the guild for its role as "crime regulator", as it does not tolerate competition or egregious conduct from its members (not to mention the personal financial benefits for authorities who play nice). It is usually considered to be a distinctly Imperial entity, though of course other organizations of the Empire do not officially condone their actions.

    Like any trade guild, the Thieves Guild is an organization of professionals, except that in this case the professionals are burglars, robbers, pickpockets, smugglers, and other enterprising operators. They typically don't have public guild halls, but sometimes have safe-houses, and members tend to gather at a single location in large towns, such as at a cornerclub, inn, or tavern. Typically, members are bound not to rob each other, kill anyone while thieving, or rob the poor. The Thieves Guild usually has the resources to bribe officials, establish a black market of stolen goods, and maintain a network of informants.
    The guild can trace its origins back to the Thieves Guild of Abah's Landing, a criminal organization that existed in the city during the Interregnum.


    Dark Brotherhood
    Link: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Dark_Brotherhood

    The Dark Brotherhood is a guild of assassins shrouded in shadow and mystery which has been active all over Tamriel. While their business is certainly not legal, their existence has typically been tolerated or ignored. Whenever an individual with legal authority takes an interest in their dealings, the Brotherhood relies upon a combination of bribery, blackmail, coercion, and murder to keep their activities hidden. They have been bitter rivals of the Morag Tong since the Second Era. The Brotherhood is also known for their worship of the Dread Father Sithis (personified chaos, also known as the Void). Dark Sisters are accepted into the Brotherhood as equals of Dark Brothers (though members of either gender are often referred to as Brothers). It is also well known that a member of the Dark Brotherhood must never real their participation in the organisation, for fear of their brothers and sisters blade.
    Like any organization, the Dark Brotherhood has some rules that all members must abide by, though the demand to adhere to them can vary with the leadership. These interrelated rules are the Five Tenets: members must never dishonour the Night Mother, betray the Dark Brotherhood, disobey or refuse to carry out an order from a superior, steal the possessions of a Dark Brother or Dark Sister, or kill a Dark Brother or Dark Sister. Breaking one of these tenets invokes the Wrath of Sithis, which, it is rumoured, is not just a turn of phrase.
    In contrast to the Morag Tong's veneration of the Daedric Prince Mephala, the Brotherhood worship the Void – Sithis. However, they see their murders as more of a business, viewing their duty through the lens of economics rather than religion and honour. They are thus frequently viewed as being more pragmatic than the Morag Tong. These differences have caused bitter enmity between the two organizations.


    Morag Tong
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Morag_Tong

    The Morag Tong is an ancient guild of assassins headquartered in Morrowind, celebrating murder in the name of Mephala. They have been active since at least the First Era, and their targets have included multiple rulers of Tamriel, high-ranking Dunmer nobility, and countless others. The Morag Tong is unique in its sanctioned status under the Morrowind government to perform legal executions, bound under contracts called 'writs', although extra-legal 'gray/grey writs' are rumoured to exist.
    They are the bitter rivals of the Dark Brotherhood, operating in a similar manner but with their rituals surrounded in a far deeper level of secrecy, and demands its members not reveal their position in their organisation.
    Ultimately, the Morag Tong pledges itself to the service of Mephala, Daedric Prince of lies, deception, and murder. In Morrowind, the guild is led by a Grandmaster, who traditionally serves for life until killed in the line of duty. Each guild hall is run by a Master, who has a high level of autonomy with regards to accepting writs and issuing assignments. Individual members, however, cannot accept writs without the approval of the Tong, or else they face punishment.
    The Morag Tong fills a vital role in Dunmeri politics by preventing all-out war between the Great Houses. Rather, they follow Mephala's advice to "kill them with secret murder" by employing Tong assassins in targeted strikes to accomplish political goals. To facilitate this, the Tong maintain a strict policy of impartiality, accepting any job provided it is proposed in the correct manner and with the proper payment. Because of its official sanction, the guild has the authority to print legal bills known as Honourable Writs of Execution, which excuse a Tong agent of all legal misgiving associated with any Tong related business. As such, Morag Tong executioners are expected to give themselves up immediately following an execution even if the death itself would have remained a mystery, in order to legally absolve themselves and avert any possible long-term ramifications. Tong executioners who fail to do so are considered suspect by their order and may be subject to major internal investigations, as the Tong does not harbour criminals.
    The most famous assassins who cannot continue their duty are sent to Vounoura, an island which is not more than a month's voyage by boat from Tel Aruhn.


    Undaunted
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Factions_U

    The Undaunted were a loose faction of adventurer’s contemporary with the Alliance War, with a history that spanned back as far as the Merethic Era. Neutral in the ongoing war, the Undaunted had members all across Tamriel and worked together to raid the greatest dungeons in the land for wealth and glory. They had so-called enclaves in some major cities, but often chose to meet at inns or taverns. Members were taught magical spells as they rose in rank. They used "practical" necromancy and viewed it as simply another branch of magic, whose beneficial applications are overshadowed by its taboo nature. Few Undaunted would shy away from such magic if it meant the difference between life and death.

    The Undaunted had a tendency to strip dungeons of all of their wealth, looting them for all the treasure they could get at. The Undaunted would always take the heads of those they defeated, sometimes to wear as armour and sometimes to display as mounted trophies. Their exploits also took them outside of Nirn to other realms, such the Deadlands, Coldharbour, and even the Clockwork City.


    Player Guilds

    Player guilds are a huge part of the ESO and Roleplay community both, no matter what their direction may be.
    Because of this huge variety, you will find that in ESO there is a function called Guild Finder where you can browse the types of guilds available; Trading, Group PvE, Roleplaying, Social, PvP, Questing and Crafting.
    Their genres are fairly self explanatory, but not all guilds are listed on the Guild Finder, and so websites based around the ESO community may also be helpful to search for in order to find the sort of guilds you desire. Friends are also a great way to learn about the guilds available, but it is worth noting that a great defining trait between guilds comes down whether or not they charge a fee for membership – something very common in trading guilds for example – but this is usually because of the funding required for certain guild resources.
    When it comes to guilds based on roleplay, hub websites and discords are a great way to find out about the types available as well as the guild finder, as are asking other roleplayers during Out-of-Character interactions with them, about what guilds they are a part of and what they recommend.
    For example, Legacies of Nirn is a hub guild in the EU server that tries to collect different guilds together to post advertisements and organise multi-guild events in the EU community. There is also the Elder Scrolls Online Roleplaying Community website where you will find a lot player guilds advertised, both EU and NA. There are guilds across all the EU and NA servers, which are incredibly helpful to the roleplaying community, newcomer or experienced player alike.


    Edited by Sanguiness130 on November 27, 2021 4:56PM
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    PART FIVE: THE SCENARIO

    Three Banners War (2E 580 --)

    In the years leading up to the Three Banners War, also called the Alliance War, a divided Tamriel had witnessed a series of conflicts and crises that had inspired the different nations of the land to band together into three distinct alliances: the greater Daggerfall Covenant in 2E 566, the Ebonheart Pact in 2E 572, and the first Aldmeri Dominion in 2E 580.
    The competing ideologies of these alliances set them on a course for war; tensions between them were further exacerbated by the Soulburst and subsequent military aggression of the Empire of Cyrodiil under Empress Regent Clivia Tharn. Each alliance saw the opportunity to overthrow the corrupt Imperial regime and install their own emperor on the Ruby Throne, but also had to deal with the other two alliances. As the armies of the Covenant, Pact, and Dominion invaded Cyrodiil with the goal of capturing the Imperial City, they additionally launched attacks against each other.

    OOC INFORMATION: The war's ultimate outcome is unknown, but all three alliances, as well as the Empire of Cyrodiil, had ceased to exist by the ninth century of the Second Era.
    This is not known within RP, naturally, as the Three Banner War continues during such.


    factions.jpg


    DAGGERFALL COVENANT
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Daggerfall_Covenant

    The Daggerfall Covenant was a military alliance between the High Rock kingdoms of Camlorn, Daggerfall, Evermore, Shornhelm, and Wayrest, the northern Hammerfell kingdom of Sentinel and the city of Hallin's Stand, and also Orsinium during the chaotic Interregnum of the Second Era.
    It vies with the Aldmeri Dominion and Ebonheart Pact for control over the contested Ruby Throne in Cyrodiil. The Covenant see's itself as the successor to the Reman Dynasty and aimed to restore the Second Empire with the legitimacy to rule all of Tamriel.
    They advocate economic prosperity and the worship of the Divines. In this mission it was led by a Royal Council, presided over by High King Emeric, a Breton merchant lord of superb diplomatic skill. The Redguards were represented by King Fahara'jad, and the Orcs by King Kurog gro-Bagrakh.


    EBONHEART PACT
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Ebonheart_Pact

    The Ebonheart Pact was a military alliance between the Great Houses Dres, Hlaalu, Indoril, and Redoran of Morrowind, the Kingdom of Eastern Skyrim, and the tribes of Murkmire, Shadowfen, and Thornmarsh in Black Marsh during the chaotic Interregnum of the Second Era.
    It vies with the Aldmeri Dominion and Daggerfall Covenant for control over the contested Ruby Throne in Cyrodiil. It was a creation of unlikely allies, who had long histories of strife between them, but united for mutual defense, first against Akaviri invaders and later against the Daedric cultists of Molag Bal in Cyrodiil.
    They aimed to wipe away the rash rule of the Empire and end once and for all mortals' entanglements with higher power from beyond Nirn. The Pact was led by Jorunn the Skald-King, who headed the Great Moot, as well as the three living gods of the Dunmer.


    ALDMERI DOMINION
    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Aldmeri_Dominion

    The Aldmeri Dominion, was an empire founded by Queen Ayrenn in 2E 580, in the midst of the Interregnum. It was conceived after Ayrenn assumed the throne of Alinor. Having traveled Tamriel extensively before returning to the Summerset Isles, she was aware of the dire threats menacing the world and saw it as the proper duty of the Elves to put things right. At the same time, the Bosmer and Khajiit were facing troubles of their own and in need of allies. Consequently, the Summerset Isles, Valenwood, and Elsweyr signed the Elden Accord and joined together to form the Dominion, which by the end of 2E 580 had entered the Alliance War to claim Cyrodiil's Ruby Throne and control of Tamriel, as well as to prevent the rival Daggerfall Covenant and Ebonheart Pact from doing the same.
    The Dominion's ultimate goal was to usher in a new age of Elven rule across Tamriel in order to protect the land from the careless actions of the younger races.

    Edited by Sanguiness130 on November 27, 2021 5:25PM
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    STORY ONE: NEREVAR AND THE TRIBUNAL
    Lore Sources: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Nerevar
    https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Battle_of_Red_Mountain
    https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:First_Era_Wars#The_War_of_the_First_Council
    https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Dagoth_Ur
    https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Heart_of_Lorkhan

    To first understand the role of Nerevar Indoril with the Tribunal, and this pivotal part of Dunmeri culture, you have to know who Nerevar was and why his death, even after all this time in Elder Scrolls, is such a well-talked about topic amongst the people of Ash.
    Nerevar Indoril was the Chimeri king of Resdayn (modern-day Morrowind). He was renowned for his magnificent feats, defeating the Nord invaders of their homeland with the help of the powerful Dwemer and his personal friend the King Dumac of said Dwemer. He united the people of Morrowind with him as their Hortator.
    He and the then ‘mortal’* Tribunal accomplished many great feats and achieved a great deal in the relative peace and prosperity within Morrowind at that time.
    (* I use the term ‘mortal’ lightly as the Chimer at this time lived far longer than any mer in Tamriel to date).
    It is after this time of peace that, arguably, the most important event in Dunmer history occurred. During what is known as either “The War of the First Council” or “The War of the Red Mountain” when one of Nerevar’s loyal companions, Voryn Dagoth, learned of the Dwemer High Craftlord Kagrenac's plan to secretly exploit the Dwemer's discovery, the Heart of Lorkhan, which the Chimer would not have tolerated, considering it blasphemous. Dagoth told Nerevar of this plan, and when Nerevar confronted his friend Dumac about it, relations broke down. Some sources suggest that the whole matter may have been the result of a misunderstanding, as Dumac may not have known about Kagrenac's plan until it was too late. At the outset, Nerevar had to once again convince the Chimer factions to band together under his leadership. Dwemeri technology undoubtedly made them the most fearsome military force on Tamriel, and though the Chimer were skilled in fighting and magic, they suffered numerous defeats in northern Resdayn until they finally once again united under Nerevar.
    It is unknown just how long the war dragged on, but through strategy, trickery, and the judicious use of Ashlander scouts, Nerevar orchestrated another climactic confrontation at Red Mountain. The battle would ultimately be another decisive victory for the Chimer, even though it would claim many lives, including Nerevar's. The Heirographa, the orthodox teachings of the Tribunal Temple, held that Nerevar, with the help of Azura and the Tribunal, utilized the Heart of Lorkhan to make the Dwemer disappear. Some Ashlander accounts corroborate that Nerevar and Azura made the Dwemer disappear, but generally hold that the Dwemer destroyed themselves. Sources conflict on many other aspects of the war, in particular the role of House Dagoth and whether Voryn Dagoth remained loyal to Nerevar.
    The end result however is undeniable. Nerevar died in the Battle of Red Mountain. But how Nerevar died at the Battle of Red Mountain is one of the most disputed topics in history. His sword Trueflame was shattered in the fighting, and its pieces were lost. The Nords say Nerevar was mortally wounded by Lorkhan, and then feigned death in order to cut out Lorkhan's Heart and defeat the God of Mortals once more. Vivec gives his own account of the events leading up to and during the battle. He glosses over how Nerevar actually met his demise, but implies that Nerevar died of wounds he received at the end of the battle from Dumac and possibly Dagoth Ur. Ashlanders believe that the Tribunal, greedy for the power of the Heart, poisoned a wounded Nerevar so he would not interfere with their plans for the Heart.
    At some time soon after the climax of the battle, following the disappearance of the Dwemer, Nerevar insisted as he lay dying that he, Almalexia, Sotha Sil, and Vivec swear upon and before Azura never to employ the Tools of Kagrenac in the profane manner that the Dwemer had intended. A few years after the battle, when the Tribunal broke their oath to Nerevar and used Kagrenac's Tools to seize divine power, Azura appeared and cursed them. She assured them that her champion Nerevar would return to punish them for their perfidy, and to make sure such profane knowledge might never again be used to mock and defy the will of the gods. When Sotha Sil dismissed her claims, all Chimer were changed into Dunmer, and she professed that all the Dunmer would share the fate of the Tribunal until the end of time. The Heirographa claimed that he lived long enough to bless the new Tribunal as protectors of his people.
    The disagreement over Nerevar's death created a schism between the Great Houses, who accepted the Tribunal as their new living gods, and the Ashlanders, who decried the Tribunal as murderers.
    And so there it is. With the death of Nerevar, and the rise of the Tribunal into the Living Gods, they doomed the Chimer for eternity to become the Dunmer, thus changing the lives of the now Dunmeri people forever.


    Edited by Sanguiness130 on November 27, 2021 6:36PM
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    STORY TWO: THE DWEMER AND THE FALMER
    Lore Sources: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Snow_Elf
    https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Falmer
    https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Dwemer

    Now that you know something of the Dwemer and their history, at least in relation to the Dunmer, this next part should come a little easier to understand.
    The Dwemer, up until their disappearance, were arguably the most powerful creatures on Tamriel at that time, though what happened to them still remains a mystery, there are dark truths in relation to these genius engineers and how they may not be quite so admirable as most in Tamriel believe.
    I should first provide you, reader, with a disclaimer that this information is nearly entirely unknown at the point of Elder Scrolls Online, but it makes for interesting reading nonetheless!
    The Snow Elves, not to be confused with the Falmer, were a people that existed on Tamriel from as early as the Merethic Era and were native to the region now known as Skyrim. The empire of the Snow Elves was expansive, wealthy, and prosperous at that time. They displayed power beyond what could be expected of the time, however, they found themselves constantly in conflict with the proto-Nords coming over from Atmora. The Nedic peoples either cohabited with or were enslaved by the elves in other parts of Tamriel; only in Skyrim did relations break down into widespread conflict. It's unknown when the conflict began; the earliest human settlements in Tamriel date back to ME800-1000, and sources suggest the relationship remained relatively harmonious for some time.
    At any rate, war broke out. After an event known as “The Night of Tears” the Snow Elves slew almost all Nedic settlers in Skyrim, with the exception of the renowned Ysgramor and his two sons. They fled to Atmora, to return with Five Hundred Companions seeking vengeance, slaying all elves they came across and clearing the way for many more settlers from Atmora to follow in their footsteps. This war waged for many years, till the Snow Elves could take no more.
    The Snow Elves had long maintained an uneasy alliance with the only other known group of mer who inhabited Skyrim: the Dwemer. The Nords established their supremacy in Skyrim, and after the devastating loss of the Snow Prince, most Snow Elves turned to their underground brethren for help. After all, there were many Snow Elf legends lauding the honor and glory of the Dwemer. The Dwemer offered to provide them a haven, but forced the Snow Elves into servitude, only allowing them to consume a toxic fungus which rendered them blind. Over time, the servants became slaves. Ancient torture chambers found in Dwemer ruins are suspected to have been used to keep their elven brethren in line. While these Snow Elves are believed to have been rendered blind by the Dwemeri toxin, it's unknown whether it was this or some other tragedy which twisted the Betrayed into the primitive creatures which have terrorized the Nords for millennia: the Falmer. The Betrayed eventually rebelled against their Dwemer slavers, leading to the purported War of the Crag which raged underneath Skyrim for decades while the Nords above remained oblivious. This war presumably ended around 1E 700, when the Dwemer race vanished from the face of Nirn.
    Some Snow Elves managed to avoid becoming slaves to the Dwemer, instead retreating to hidden shrines or hiding with sympathetic families. Over a hundred were at the isolated Chantry of Auri-El when the Dwemer made their offer, and by the time news of it reached them, they were too late to stop it. These few remaining Snow Elves look upon their twisted brethren with pity. However, these sentiments were not shared by the Falmer, as they attacked their untainted cousins with the same ferocity that they displayed towards the other surface races.
    Over the ages, the Snow Elves passed into legend, and disappeared from almost all story and histories of the elvish people, but the Falmer remain to this day as savage beings dwelling deep within Dwemer ruins and expansive caverns, like Blackreach, attacking any who come across them.


    Edited by Sanguiness130 on November 27, 2021 5:06PM
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    STORY THREE: DRAGONS AND THE DRAGON WAR
    Lore Sources: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Dragons
    https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Dragon_Priest
    https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Nord#The_Dragon_War

    Many Nords may have long forgotten the truth behind their legends of Dragons, but they nonetheless remain a prominent part of Nord culture, and relevant history to the Elder Scrolls. In fact, many of you who play Elder Scrolls Online likely have played Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, and as such you know quite a lot about them, but to those who don’t, this is for you.
    Dragons are said to be eternal, immortal, unchanging, and unyielding. According to the writings of Archmage Shalidor, dragons had existed since before the advent of sequential time in the Dawn Era, but were initially as wild as anything else. It was Alduin, Firstborn of Akatosh, who created their civilization. Nordic legend says that, in these early years, the dragons were the only creatures who could harness the power of their voice for great feats of magic, though they only did so in times of "True Need". Despite dragons supposedly existing before time was a concept, some dragons are described as being more ancient than others, with Alduin and Paarthurnax considered the oldest by other dragons, hence why not all of them are considered equal in power.
    Dragons are well-known for their affinity for magic. It is unknown how they possess the ability to speak and fly despite their lack of lips or the fact that their wings are not naturally strong enough to support such heavy torsos. Blessed with remarkable intelligence, they are nonetheless susceptible to feelings of pride and melancholy. They are distrustful creatures, even of each other. Despite this, they are also somewhat social, and can be driven mad by captivity and isolation. As the immortal children of Akatosh, they are specially attuned to the flow of time, and they feel an innate urge to dominate others that is near-impossible to overcome. In the mind of a dragon, being powerful and being right are the same, thus they make no distinction between speaking and fighting; battles between them are actually deadly verbal debates.
    Although dragons are immortal, their physical form can be destroyed. Although they may appear to have been killed, dragons defeated in such a manner are not truly dead and can rise again.
    And now, to the Dragon War.
    Dragons were revered as part of the Nordic religion. Dragon priests, on par with kings in terms of the power they wielded, acted as intermediaries between the people and the serpentine "god-kings", whose name could not even be uttered by the common folk. Temples were built to honor and appease the dragons, many of which survive today as ancient ruins haunted by Draugr and undead dragon priests. The dragon priests in Tamriel became more tyrannical and the populace eventually rebelled some time in the Merethic Era, leading to the legendary Dragon War. Some dragons turned against their own kind and taught the Nords powerful magic that allowed them to turn the tide of the war in their favor. After a long and bloody campaign, the rule of the dragons was ended, and the remaining wyrms fled to remote areas.
    During the Merethic Era, Dragon Priests kept the population enthralled and obedient by means of a widespread dragon-worshipping cult, and many people of this era became the undead draugr that still prowl the crypts of Skyrim, Solstheim, Atmora, and anywhere else the dragon priests "kept peace between dragons and men". The center of power in Skyrim of this dragon empire is thought to have been Bromjunaar, where dragon priests decided matters of their law.
    Nordic legend holds that Alduin led his brethren and their once-benevolent minions to terrorize and subjugate the mortal races, triggering a rebellion. The dragons began indiscriminately slaughtering them under the orders of Alduin, who had chosen to forsake his proper duties and conquer the land.
    During this Dragon War, mortals found ways to kill the dragons, who were previously thought undefeatable. Some people, notably priests of the Nine Divines, claim that Akatosh intervened against the dragons to help end the war, and that some dragons fought against their own kind. The dragon Paarthurnax took pity on the Nords (purportedly at the request of Kyne), and instructed several in the ways of the thu'um so that they could channel the power of their own voices using the tongue of the dragons. These first Tongues (masters of the Voice) used their new power to turn the tide of the war, and they eventually "shout[ed] Alduin out of the world". The remaining dragons were hunted and killed until they were nearly extinct, clearing the way for the many empires which have risen and fallen since.
    The Dragon Cult survived for a time, but was marginalized and eventually died out. The last Dragon Cult Stronghold was found and besieged in 1E 140. Not long after, worship of animal gods was replaced by the then-Eight Divines in mainstream Nord culture. Other traditional Nordic beliefs, known as the Old Ways, continued on, and remained prevalent among Nords even after the introduction of the Divines.
    Whilst some dragons survived, where they are and what happened to them after the Dragon War is unknown. (See Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim for events after Elder Scrolls Online concerning dragons).


    STORY FOUR: THE ORDER OF BLADES AND THE DRAGONGUARD
    Lore Sources: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Blades
    https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Tiber_Septim

    The Blades, also known as the Imperial Intelligence Service, the Arms of the Throne and as the Order of Blades, were members of an elite Imperial order dedicated to the protection and service of the Dragonborn emperors of Tamriel. Descended from the Akaviri Dragonguard, who became the personal bodyguard of Emperor Reman I, the Blades have since diversified into many areas of Imperial espionage, military, and diplomacy. Indeed, while a select few were appointed by the emperor to serve openly as diplomats or bodyguards, the majority of Blades agents acted covertly as couriers and spies. Serving as the emperor's eyes and ears, a vast network of Blades have influenced many critical events across Tamriel.
    The history of the Blades stretches back many centuries, to the Akaviri Dragonguard. They relentlessly hunted dragons in Akavir, and in 1E 2703 they invaded Tamriel to continue this crusade. They marched through Morrowind and Skyrim with little resistance until being met by the united forces of Cyrodiil under Reman I at the Pale Pass, in the Jerall Mountains. As soon as they heard Reman's voice at Pale Pass, they knelt before him and proclaimed him Dragonborn, claiming he was what they had come to seek. These new additions to his army did much to enable Reman's conquest and unification of most of Tamriel to found the Second Empire. However, the Dragonguard had not forgotten their original mission, and they continued hunting dragons, particularly in Skyrim, with great success.
    They worked tirelessly to hunt down the dragons of Nirn, and once the dragons were nearly driven to extinction in the next two centuries, and the Dragonguard operated chapters across Tamriel under the direct command of the Dragonborn emperors.
    Unfortunately, as the Dragonguard had not yet evolved into the espionage specialists that were the Blades, they failed to prevent Emperor Reman III's assassination by the Morag Tong in 1E 2920. The Dragonguard was officially disbanded after this ignominious event, with many members becoming mercenaries and later forming the Fighters Guild. Others went on to ensure the martial and mystical arts of old Akavir would survive into the Second Era, and became known as Dragonknights. Unofficially, some were retained by the Akaviri Potentates, now as a covert force rather than an honour guard. Others continued hunting the wary surviving dragons in Skyrim until at least 2E 373.

    During the long Interregnum, in the absence of any true emperor to protect, the Dragonguard protected the Ruby Throne in the Imperial City from the petty warlords who ran rampant in Cyrodiil. They were driven underground by Empress Regent Clivia Tharn during the Planemeld after captain Sai Sahan disappeared, but continued to operate in the province under pseudonyms.
    Some would-be emperors formed their own personal 'Dragonguard' to add legitimacy to their rule, although these were only imitations of the Akaviri, not a continuation. Clivia Tharn had her own imitation Dragonguard. Members of the real Dragonguard who went underground took on pseudonyms with the title 'Drake of', and worked to safeguard artifacts and information until a real Dragonborn Emperor took the Ruby Throne. The real Dragonguard also sought out and protected potential Dragonborn individuals, including the future Tiber Septim, in a bid to place one on the throne.
    The Dragonguard assisted in thwarting the Planemeld by helping the Vestige in fending off Molag Bal's invasion of the Imperial City (2E 582), and when a Xivkyn servant of Molag Bal disguised as Clivia Tharn took control of the White Gold Tower to recover an Elder Scroll required for the Planemeld, the Dragonguard once again helped thwart the siege of their beloved city alongside the Vestige.

    The Dragonguard later aided in the conflict in Elsweyr under the help of the returned Sai Sahan, and after such quietly remained there once their business was done till the rise of Tiber Septim several hundred years later (2E 854).

    Edited by Sanguiness130 on January 24, 2022 4:09PM
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    STORY FIVE: THE AYLEIDS AND THEIR INFLUENCE
    Lore Sources: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Ayleid

    The Ayleids, also known as the Heartland High Elves, Wild Elves or Saliache were the first race to establish an empire in Tamriel, and had ruled modern-day Cyrodiil for countless years dating back to before recorded history. The Ayleids began as groups of Mer who left the Summerset Isles to create splinter cultures in central and southwest Tamriel. Ayleidoon, their language, is similar to Aldmeris, the ancient language of the Aldmer, which given their roots is unsurprising.

    The Ayleids were the original founders of the Imperial City, which they called the "Temple of the Ancestors". However, their empire collapsed in the early First Era. While it's believed that the Ayleids remain in the wilds of every province on Tamriel, sightings have been few and it has been often suggested that the remnants of the Ayleid’s interbred with the Bosmer of Valenwood after their empires fell.
    If one were to put their accomplishments as a whole into words, it would be assuredly a long list, but with so much lost over the ravages of war and time, the parts of their culture and practices that remain prominent can be broken down into three sections. Architecture, magic and conflict.

    Much like how the ruins of the lost Dwemer dot Hammerfell, Skyrim, and Morrowind, the Ayleids have left ruins scattered around Cyrodiil and other regions which were once under the dominion of their Empire. These underground cities can prove deadly for adventurers, hiding such dangers as traps, monsters, undead, and criminals. Their cities were amazing feats of architecture ranging from small settlements to gigantic, labyrinth-like metropolises shaped out of whitish rock. But one cannot forget their most prominent architectural contribution, the aforementioned Imperial City itself. A design of structure that has remained throughout the ages and symbolises the once prominent and overwhelming ability the Ayleid’s held over Tamriel and their understanding of craft.

    They also seem to have had a firm grasp of the magical arts, notably so, as many of their ruins contain stones filled with magicka essences harvested from the sky. They also developed what came to be called the school of Alteration, leaving such a long-lasting impact on the culture and teaching of magic that they are still spoken of as being the affluent forefathers of magic through history. They also preserved many of the ancient runes and Dawn Era magics of the Ehlnofey that other elves had forgotten, allowing the races that followed to rediscover these treasures of information over the years after.

    Leading thus into their conflicts, and how that shaped the races left behind after the Ayleid’s disappearance. Though they settled predominantly in Cyrodiil, the "Barsaebic Ayleids" also had settlements in modern-day Black Marsh. The Ayleid rulers of Black Marsh were renowned as necromancers and titled the Fenlords. The cities Gideon and Stormhold were originally Ayleid settlements whose names have been lost to history. The earliest Aldmeri account of the Heartlands of Cyrodiil from Topal the Pilot speaks of friendly feathered Bird Men who resided there, but these natives disappeared from history, only to be replaced by the Ayleids. It is also alleged that the Bird Men were enslaved by the Ayleids.

    In the last millennium of the Merethic Era, Daedra worship took hold and spread among the Heartland High Elves. The cults devoted to the various Daedric Princes which had sprung up across Cyrodiil, once merely tolerated, became celebrated. Unlike the Chimer who left Summerset in the Late Middle Merethic Era, the Ayleids made no distinction between "good" and "bad" Daedra. Even some of the more heinous Princes received mass veneration, especially when their worship was adopted and endorsed by Ayleid kings and aristocrats.
    The Ayleids made deals with Daedra for more power, blessings, and other advantages. They employed entire armies of Daedra to conquer, subjugate, and enforce their rule. In the earliest Cyro-Nordic stories, Shezarr fought against the Ayleids on mankind's behalf, then vanished, presumably to go help humans elsewhere. Without his leadership, the Cyrodiils were dominated and enslaved by the Ayleids. At first this enslavement of the Nedic peoples was occasional, but eventually this became a systematic, widespread institution of Ayleid society. They eventually controlled the entirety of modern-day Cyrodiil, and kept the Nedic peoples there enslaved for generations.
    The example of the Nords to the north inspired the Alessian Slave Rebellion of 1E 242. Alessia's rebellion coincided with a civil war within the Ayleid Empire which led to many rebel Ayleid lords joining forces with Alessia and aiding her rebellion. These allies of Alessia were largely Aedra-worshippers, indicating that the schism among the Ayleids was likely related to religious differences.
    Skyrim, of course, lent help to their enslaved relatives under the Ayleid Empire, which also played a part in the Ayleids being overthrown. In only a year, the Slave Queen Alessia and her supporters had taken the White-Gold Tower, founded the Alessian Empire, and secured the subsequent shift in power from mer to men on Tamriel.

    The Alessian Slave Rebellion was devastating to the Ayleids. Legend says entire settlements were slaughtered at the hands of Alessia's champion, Pelinal Whitestrake. Though the Ayleids would continue to have a presence in Cyrodiil for several hundred years, the fall of the White-Gold Tower in 1E 243 signalled the beginning of the Late Ayleid Period. The tower was turned into the Imperial Palace by Alessia and her descendants, no longer recognised as a place of Ayleid worship, and it remains so to this day the seat of power in Cyrodiil. The Bravil region was one of the very last areas to be liberated by the Alessian army. It took Alessia's forces, led by Bravillius Tasus, four attempts to finally defeat them. In these early years, the Alessian Empire forbade the worship of the Daedric Princes and focused on hunting down and exterminating Daedra-worshipping Ayleids.

    After so much conflict over the territory, the Ayleids simply left Cyrodiil, eventually being absorbed into the elven populations of Valenwood and High Rock. It's speculated that the exodus of the Ayleids from Cyrodiil may have vastly strengthened the Direnni Hegemony in High Rock - in which case, the Ayleids had their revenge, as the war with the Direnni eventually crippled the Alessian Empire and brought about its fall.

    The only known Ayleids who remained in Cyrodiil served as mentors and tutors for the new human nobility. The last remaining kingdom of the Ayleids, Nenalata, was last heard of in 1E 482 at the Battle of Glenumbria Moors. Following the battle, the so-called last king of the Ayleids, Laloriaran Dynar, was lured back to Nenalata and tricked by Molag Bal to henceforth serve as a prisoner in Coldharbour. Whether Laloriaran Dynar's people made it through the next few centuries is unknown, but this was a significant event: the Late Ayleid Period was ended, and the Ayleids would never again be seen as a military or political power.
    And so, the Ayleid’s passed into legend, being thought of only in their prominent contributions to the society that developed after them, rather than the might they once were.


    STORY SIX: DEATH, IMMORTALITY AND THE AFTERLIFE
    Lore Sources: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Death

    Death is an ever-present concern for all life on Tamriel. No matter the race or culture they were raised in, everyone knows of the inevitable end that awaits them all.
    The differences in their belief of an ‘afterlife’ very much stems from religion and/or daedric benefactors. I will divide up the next part here into what each race and faith believe with regards to death and funeral customs.

    ALTMERS VIEW ON DEATH
    Altmer worship Xarxes, one of their Eight Divines, as the god of the deceased, equivalent to other races' death gods. He records the life-stories of all the elven races, and his worship, at least as recorded in written history, predates that of Arkay.

    In the two most common origin myths, Xarxes appears either as Auri-El's scribe, recording events at his side since the beginning of time, or as a Merethic Aldmeri priest of Auri-El who was elevated to divinity by the higher deity. The latter story is consistent with the High Elves' conceit that they are directly descended from the Aedra, and can, in certain miraculous circumstances, apotheosize and re-ascend to godly status. For the Altmer, Xarxes records not just the life stories of individual elves, but all the connections of lineage and heritance that bind them together and link them to their ancestors. As nothing is more important to an Altmer than his or her ancestry, it is easy to understand Xarxes' paramount role in defining and maintaining status and stability in Summerset society.

    Upon death, the Altmer (including Direnni) believe they ascend to the Empyrean of Aetherius. To the Altmer, mortal life is nothing more than a punishment imposed by the trickery of Lorkhan to the Eight original Divines. And, although they venerate their ancestors, they only do so by respecting the orderly and blissful passage of these spirits from this world to the next. That is, High Elves believe it is cruel and unnatural to encourage the spirits of the dead to linger in Mundus. For those who die in dishonor, their families will strike all traces of their existence and they will not be remembered as an ancestor; they will simply vanish from memory, a fate worse than death itself.


    Altmer do not bury their dead. Sentimental folks may erect shrines or make something to remember a lost loved one by. The High Elves cremate their dead and then bury their ashes in wall shrines. Both Altmer kinlords and kings commonly built massive mausoleums, where successive generations rest, and their descendants, especially new rulers, come to present their respects and to seek guidance. Due to this, these sites also serve as temples to the Ancestors. Priests dedicated to tending the dead keep these places clean from corrupting influences, commonly bearing holy symbols, imbued with divine power to repel necromantic magic.

    Altmer highly respect their deceased, any necromancer caught in the Summerset Isles can expect the worst possible punishments. In the case the defiler is an Altmer who has grown too powerful, there are special magical prisons for them to be confined to. The Banished Cells, in northernmost Auridon, are the paramount example of this. High Kinlord Rilis XII of Firsthold was imprisoned here. He tampered with forbidden knowledge and consorted with Daedra in pursuit of magical power.

    ARGONIANS VIEW ON DEATH
    Argonian souls return to the Hist after death. A Hist tree's sap is its soul. When an Argonian is created, the Hist's sap becomes the Argonian's blood, essence, and soul. Argonian spirits are made from the essence of their Hist tree, which is the sap. In accordance with this, Argonian corpses are laid to rest in the wilds without much extra casing, save for a mask and a stake.

    The Adzi-Kostleel tribe of Argonians believe that the world was created in a struggle between two spirits. Originally, there was Atak, the Great Root. As Atak grew, it's roots "formed new roots, and those roots took names, and they wanted space of their own to grow." Soon, it discovered the serpent spirit, Kota, who had been born from the Nothing and hungered. Atak and Kota fought and ate at each other until they became something new and indistinguishable, Atakota. They shed their skin and Shadow and went to sleep. The Shadow ate the roots and was changed by them, keeping them safe and telling them the secrets before releasing them instead of devouring them, letting itself sleep as well. The secrets changed the roots, making them realize they were now temporary and could change.

    Many of the spirits learned to fear this change, calling it Death. The chaos that ensued awoke Atakota and split them once more, leading to Atak and Kota and their roots going to war over the existence of Death. Some of the roots drank of Atakota's blood and sap until they grew scales, fangs, and wings. Other roots were protected by a Forest Spirit, singing with her and becoming one with the forest. In the chaos of the war, the Shadow awoke and ate both Atak and Kota, shedding the skin of Atakota and covering all of the roots, promising to keep them safe.


    When an Argonian dies, their corpse is laid to rest in the marsh. Burying the bodies, or at least allowing them to be among nature, allows them to return to the Hist. Argonians that have died away from the Hist, even in stone prisons such as White Rose, can return to the Hist by bringing their bones to the dirt. The deceased is fitted with a wooden funerary mask and buried in the ground. A xul-vaat, or grave-stake, is used to pin the corpse into the ground (whether it's buried or not) so it doesn't float up to the surface when the ground inevitably floods, and to stop it from rising as an undead bog blight.

    The xul-vaat don't just prevent the corpses from floating to the surface of the bog. The deceased's story is carved upon their stake. Tales of their victories and defeats, tales from childhood, names of friends, dreams, and nightmares—a grave-stake tells those who see it about the corpse it impales. Each stake planted into the mud tells a story, some as old as the marsh itself. Sometimes they are laid at the roots of the Hist, sometimes they are buried in graveyards, or in places that held sentimental value for the deceased, and for some the body is staked where it fell. The stake marks the burial site and serves as a remembrance until it is claimed by the swamp.

    When death arrives to a tribe, the tribe's grave-singer is called upon to tend the corpse and stake it. The grave-singer is tasked with reading their tribe's stakes, and when someone dies, they sing the fallen one's final song. Grave-Singers care for the bodies of the fallen and deal with death, however it may appear to the tribe. The grave-singer of the Naga-Kur has an additional task: harvesting scales, skin, bones and other parts from the bodies of the fallen as needed, so the tribe can make weapons and armor. Argonian spirits return to the Hist when they die; the Naga-Kur do not bind their spirits to the weapons they make with the bones of their fallen kin.

    Those who commit blasphemies against the Saxhleel are punished by denying them the ability to return to the Hist. This can be done by binding them to an urn. None of the Argonians buried following the rites of the Hist are anointed with Arkay's Blessing, which in the very least prevents the souls of other races from being used without their consent. Even so, it is uncommon for foreign necromancers to come to Black Marsh to practice their art, because corpses decay very quickly.

    BOSMERS VIEW ON DEATH
    Although Bosmer venerate both Arkay and Xarxes, the most common death deities among Tamrielic pantheons, their lives and deaths are guided by the covenant their people signed with Y'ffre as the spirit of "the now": the Green Pact. Because of this, their roles in the Bosmeri afterlife are minimal compared to other cultures.

    Bosmer give little importance to their ancestors beyond noble ascendancy, mostly because they prefer to live in the Aurbic Now. They follow the ways of Y'ffre, taught by the spinners and enforced by the treethanes, showing relatively little regard for the ways of ages long past. This is why Xarxes is not regarded as an important agent in Bosmer deaths: unlike the High Elves, the Bosmer don't care as much about recording their lineage.

    After their deaths, Wood Elves who have not violated the Green Pact during their lives become free from their body-prisons and reunite with the Aedra and their ancestors in Aetherius. The Ooze is a purgatorial state reserved for Bosmer who violate the Green Pact, collectively called Apostates. Their names are scrubbed from Y'ffre's story and replaced with silence. Furthermore, their souls return to the formlessness which remained after Y'ffre spun the story, an act which shaped Nirn itself.


    All deceased Bosmer are buried by their relatives following a peaceful death, or by their enemies, if they were killed by other Wood Elves. Following the cannibalistic "Meat Mandate" of the Pact, Bosmer are required to eat both fallen enemies and deceased relatives before three days pass, never leaving the corpses to rot. They only bury their skeletons. Bosmer architecture is based upon shaping the very trees so they do not build monumental burial sites. In fact, many of the Bosmer burial sites, even the most remarkable ones, are simply groves. So, when the meat is consumed, the bones are collected and buried in ossuaries, places where only the local Bosmer leave their dead; or in common graveyards, most usually built by other races in Valenwood. Even Bosmer who died having broken the rules of the Green Pact, the Apostates, must be buried in secluded ossuaries, separate from Green Pact-abiding Bosmer.

    Necromancy is not a particularly common practice in Valenwood, since the bones alone are more difficult to raise than intact bodies. In fact, local Bosmer may seem more amused than offended at the prospect of lazy ancestors being made to get up and do something useful for once.

    A particular funerary custom unique to the Bosmer happens when a tribe member is slain. This tradition, known as the "Mourning War" is practiced nearly everywhere outside the cities of Valenwood. The deceased is symbolically replaced via a hostage-taking raid on a neighboring tribe. If the deceased was an especially powerful or prestigious member of the tribe, multiple captives may be taken to replace them. The captive or captives undergo a period of physical torture, supposedly to test their worthiness, and then are joyously welcomed into the clan. Traditionally, the victim was given the deceased tribe member's position, possessions, and family, though this practice may be rarely honored in modern ages. Mourning wars are an ancient tradition; scholarly references to them date back to the First Era.

    BRETONS VIEW ON DEATH
    Bretons worship Arkay, one of their Divines, as the paramount god of the dead. His worship, at least as recorded in written history, originated after that of Nord Orkey and Elven Xarxes and it is taught he was once a mortal who ascended to godhood. Scholarly views on the matter explains that Arkay is merely a convenient syncretic god between Orkey and Xarxes, becoming an integral part of the religion of the Nedes (and the people descending from them) freed by Alessia. Although the Bretons became the most influenced group of the Nedes' descendants by the High Elves, they continued to worship Arkay as the god of the death, instead of Xarxes, god of their Direnni overlords.

    Considering themselves one of the most faithful people in Tamriel, devoted to the Divines (both Eight or Nine, depending on the century) the Bretons believe Arkay commands the souls of the deceased to the realm of Aetherius, where they meet their gods and their ancestors. The Direnni left their mark upon the Bretons, who maintained the same aristocratic structures of powers those Altmer had built in the previous centuries. As nothing is more important to an Altmer than his or her ancestry, it is easy to understand Breton nobles and kings (thought to be the rightful successors to the Direnni) valued their ancestry to maintain and expand their status in High Rock society. As a result, prestigious ancestors, as well as royal and noble bloodlines, are respected and remembered with high esteem.

    To the Bretons, Arkay is the God of the Cycle of Birth and Death, who spends eternity making sure that deaths and births stay in proper balance in the physical world.


    Traditions dating back to the witch kings and nomadic horsemen mandated cremation of the dead. This was likely influenced by the Altmer of the Direnni Hegemony, an aristocratic state which ruled over High Rock during the First Era, who also cremated their dead. This tradition remained longer in the north than in the south, where Imperial burial customs frequently usurped traditional Breton practices.

    By the Second Era, Bretons had abandoned cremation. All of the dead—from commoners to kings—were buried underground, returning to the traditions of their other Human cousins. Kings and high nobility are commonly buried in crypts and catacombs, usually built outside of the cities and towns. Dishonored kings and nobles are segregated from their relatives and entombed in special crypts, only to be forgotten by history and their descendants. Breton commoners, on the other hand, most usually rest in graveyards, where their bodies are buried within a coffin in familial or individual tombs. Burial sites are commonly guarded by Arkay's priests, who watch over the rest of the dead.

    Arkay's priests in High Rock give every Breton his Three Consecrations: Arkay's Grace, which they bestow upon birth, to protect the souls of the innocent until they are old enough to exercise their own volition; Arkay's Blessing, which they bestow upon the dying, to prevent their souls from being used without consent; and Arkay's Law, which they bestow upon the deceased, that their corporeal forms may not be raised to unlawful servitude.

    Most, if not all, Breton bodies are anointed with the Three Consecrations, yet necromancy is still a common practice in High Rock due to the amount of dispensable corpses left to rot on battlefields without any further blessing or burial.

    DUNMERS VIEW ON DEATH
    The departed spirits of the House Dunmer, entombed in their ancestral tombs, persist after death. The knowledge and power of departed ancestors benefits the bloodlines of their descendants. The bond between the living family members and immortal ancestors is partly blood, partly ritual, partly volitional.

    Both House Dunmer and Ashlander do not emphasize the distinction between Mundus, Aetherius and Oblivion. They regard all these planes as a whole with many paths from one end to the other rather than separate worlds of different natures with distinct borders. This philosophical viewpoint may account for the greater affinity of elves for magic and its practices. Dark Elves don't believe that death is the end, but the beginning.

    Ancestral tomb-bound spirits will always recognize their own kind, regardless of time passed since the last time they communed with the living. However, if they are angry with their descendants, they may attack them, although even a stranger could gain their trust if first pay the proper respects in the family shrines within the tomb. Spirits do not like to visit the mortal world, and they do so only out of duty and obligation. For them, the otherworld is more pleasant, or at least more comfortable for spirits than Mundus, which is cold, bitter, and full of pain and loss. Some spirits are bound against their wills to protect family shrines. This unpleasant fate is reserved for those who have not served the family faithfully in life. Dutiful and honorable ancestral spirits often aid in the capture and binding of wayward spirits. These spirits usually go mad, and make terrifying guardians. They are ritually prevented from harming mortals of their clans, but that does not necessarily discourage them from mischievous or peevish behavior. They are exceedingly dangerous for intruders. At the same time, if an intruder can penetrate the spirit's madness and play upon the spirit's resentment of his own clan, the angry spirits may be manipulated.

    Respect for the departed ones is a central part of Ashlander culture. If an outlander wants to be respected, they should honor them as well.


    When a Dunmer passes, his body is given to fire, so "he might return to the ash from whence he came".

    It is a House Dunmer family's most solemn duty to make sure their ancestor's remains after cremation are interred properly in a City of the Dead such as Necrom. There, the spirits draw comfort from one another against the chill of the mortal world. However, as a sign of great honor and sacrifice, an ancestor may grant that part of his remains be retained to serve as part of a ghost fence protecting the clan's shrine and family precincts. Such an arrangement is often part of the family member's will, that a bone shall be saved out of his remains and incorporated with solemn magic and ceremony into a clan ghost fence. In more exceptional cases, an entire skeleton or even a preserved corpse may be bound into a ghost fence. These remains become a beacon and focus for ancestral spirits, and for the spirit of the remains in particular. The more remains used to make a ghost fence, the more powerful the fence is. And the most powerful mortals in life have the most powerful remains. A necropolis can be created to contain the remains of a group of significance. This was the case for Othrenis, a necropolis that contains the mages that sealed the Brothers of Strife in Stonefalls.

    Each House Dunmer family has a shrine. In poorer homes, it may be no more than a hearth or alcove where ancestors' relics are displayed and venerated. In wealthy homes, a room is set aside for the use of the ancestors. The most powerful families possessed ancestral tombs dedicated uniquely to the worship of their ancestors. These shrines are called the Waiting Door, and represents the door to Oblivion. There the family members pay their respects to their ancestors through sacrifice and prayer, through oaths sworn upon duties, and through reports on the affairs of the family. In return, the family may receive information, training, and blessings from the family's ancestors. The ancestors are thus the protectors of the home, and especially the precincts of the Waiting Door.

    During the decades between the construction of the Great Ghostfence around the Red Mountain and the rise of the New Temple and the fall of the False Tribunal, there were many changes in the practice of ancestor worship among Dunmer Houses. With the vast majority of ancestors' remains going to strengthen the Great Ghostfence, there remained very few clan ghost fences in Morrowind. The Temple discouraged such practices among the Houses as selfish. The upkeep of family tombs and private Waiting Doors also fell into disfavor. During those years most Dunmer venerated a small portion of their ancestor's remains kept at a local temple. A short time after the Red Year, the traditions came back with the approbation of the New Temple, and new Ancestral Tombs were built.

    Ashlanders simply bury their cremated bodies in the ground and mark the place with a cairn, identified by the possessions of the departed. Honored ancestors usually receive offerings, mostly based on the deeds of that particular Dunmer. The Four First Ashkhans (Nalor Ahemmusa, Shadar Erabenimsum, Lammak Urshilaku, and Akami Zainab) were buried in and around Ald'ruhn and had to be ritually honored with specific presents (an ashen fern, an enemy's weapon, the bones of a fallen guar, and a jeweled cuttle). In contrast with House Dunmer, Ashlanders think ancestral tombs tend to go feral in time, because their spirit inhabitants used to be forgotten and suffer imprisoned without the proper communion, so they elude them.

    Dunmer regard Necromancy upon any of the accepted races as an abomination. However, before the Third Era, it was acceptable to practice it on other races, especially those of slaves. Telvanni mages were especially skilled necromancers. After the outlawing of Necromancy and before the abolition of slavery, Necromancy thrive taking slaves at a modest rate. Most assumed the slave escaped or died. However, by the Fourth Era, this situation changed dramatically.

    IMPERIALS VIEW ON DEATH
    Imperials worship Arkay, one of their Divines, as the paramount god of the dead. His worship, at least as recorded in written history, originated after that of Nord Orkey and elven Xarxes and it is taught that he was a mortal who ascended to godhood. Scholar views on the matter explains that Arkay is merely a convenient syncretic god between Orkey and Xarxes, becoming an integral part of the religion of the Nedes (and the people descending from them) freed by Alessia. The Imperials became the most influenced society by the Alessian Order and its vision of the afterlife. Alessians believed that one devoted to their doctrines can persist beyond the illusion of death, this is, to expunge corruption and conquer the Arkayn Cycle.

    Imperials call Aetherius, the realm of the afterlife, Heaven. Imperial Theosophy teaches that Heaven is also the plane of pure magicka and the seat of the Divines and the other original spirits. Oblivion surrounds Mundus every night, but from Aetherius, energy infuses the daily existence, from highest to lowest, and gives all common purpose. Its magic "brings the rain to the fields, love to the hearts, and scientific principles to the technological industries". It gives the very Sun itself. Finally, Aetherius is the home to the Aedra, those cornerstones of the Mundus whose aspects are seen "in temple, in lordship, and the high walk of heroes".


    Imperials bury all their dead, commonly underground both in graveyards, built in the interior of vicinity of cities and towns; and in catacombs below the chapels of the Churches of the Eight or the Nine, depending on the age. Gravestones dot the terrain of Imperial graveyards, signaling the location of the buried coffins where the dead rest. This is the most common form of entombment for commoners. On the other side, the nobility is commonly buried in crypts and catacombs, usually built outside of the cities and towns or below the temples of the Imperial cities. All these places are commonly guarded by Arkay's priests, who watch over the rest of the dead.

    Arkay's priests in Cyrodiil and beyond give every Imperial his Three Consecrations, to protect the souls and the bodies of the deceased, just like the Bretons do.

    Most, if not all, Imperial buried bodies are anointed with the Three Consecrations, even criminals who will be executed by the law. Necromancy is still a common practice in Cyrodiil, due to the disposal of corpses given by the government to certain necromancers allied with the state to practice their arts.

    One particular place held by the Imperials as especially sacred as a burial ground is Sancre Tor, where the ancient tombs of the Reman emperors lie. Following the defeat of the Akaviri invaders, Sancre Tor enjoyed a brief resurgence of wealth and culture under Reman Cyrodiil and his descendants, Reman II and Reman III. Tracing his ancestry to Saint Alessia, and following the tradition that Saint Alessia was buried in the catacombs beneath Sancre Tor, although some may say she is buried under the Temple of the One, Reman built splendid funerary precincts in the depths of the ancient citadel under-passages. Here the last Reman emperor, Reman III, was buried in his tomb with the Amulet of Kings. During the Interregnum, the place became abandoned, and no one of the numerous Emperors were buried in Sancre Tor. The place was only briefly reoccupied before Tiber Septim lay siege to the holy city and recovered the Amulet of Kings. After that, neither the Septim nor the Mede Emperors bury their remains in Sancre Tor.

    KHAJIITS VIEW ON DEATH
    After the Riddle'Thar was revealed to the Khajiit by the prophet Rid-Thar-ri'Datta during the Second Era, this cosmic order will set a guideline by which to live rather than to embody a single entity. Depending on the actions during their lives, their fate differ between "true cats" and "bent cats". A true cat hunts without rest for the Right Trail, trying one after another of the endless paths Jone and Jode, but it is easy for a cat to grow bored and abandon the chase. And this is why the Moon clergy inspires the kittens, sharing stories of the oldest times, nudging them back to the true way; and also must rebuke the naughty cats, swatting the ones who stray upon their flanks until they return to the paths the Moons weave. At the end of a life guided by the Riddle'Thar lies Llesw'er, also known as the Sands Behind the Stars, a paradise where sugar forms the dunes and the joyous Moonlight Chorus sounds. When a Khajiit dies, it is Khenarthi who guides their soul either to Azurah for judgment, or to Llesw'er, the Sands Behind the Stars.

    A true cat may stumble, may lose his way and come upon the temptations of a darker dance led by Lorkhaj, the Moon Beast. The Moon clergy states that Fadomai gave birth to Lorkhaj, the last of her litter, in the Great Darkness, so the Heart of Lorkhaj was filled with the Great Darkness, giving her consciousness and a name and it was Namiira. Later, Lorkhaj tricked his siblings so that they were forced into this new place with Nirni. And many of Fadomai's children escaped and became the stars, while others died to make Nirni's path stable. And the survivors stayed and punished Lorkhaj, said to be turned into a third moon, the "Dark Moon" which governs the fate of the dro-m'Athra, as Jone and Jode govern the fate of the Khajiit.

    When true cats die, their souls are lifted by Khenarthi and flown to the Sands Behind the Stars, to play and prey until the Next Pounce. A dro-m'Athra can twist out a bent cat's soul, and send it through the cracks directly to the Darks, a ritual known as the Bent Dance. Khajiit are protected by the Ways of Jone (killing that lost cats) and Jode (bathing them in moonlight) from falling into the Bent Dance. Also, when bent cats die, their souls are dragged down by Namiira into the Dark Behind the World, to serve the Heart of Lorkhaj, the Frightful Heart, "until their tails are straight".


    Khajiit bury all their dead, often in coffins, where the dead rest with their most precious possessions or other relics. Most of these burials are protected, at least, in name, by the Moon clergy. Commonly, families are buried together underground, so their spirits can rest in afterlife. Anequine Khajiit are often buried with only a small cairn of stones. The desert will preserve their bodies for hundreds of years without further preparation. On the other hand, Pellitinian Khajiit bury their deceased underground, marked with a gravestone, and like their northern cousins, without further rites. The humid climate of southern Elsweyr will rot their bodies rapidly. City Khajiit prefer to bury their dead in catacombs or graveyards. Certain noble or wealthy Khajiit may have a monumental tomb constructed, where their corpses and most valuable artifacts will rest. A general custom for Khajiit is to plant Waning Lilies at holy sites in remembrance of beloved family members that have died.

    Almost none of the Khajiit are anointed with Arkay's Blessing due to their particular beliefs and the emphasis of the soul over the body. Khajiit show moderate indifference to graves being uncovered and corpses being disturbed. It is indeed true that in the port of Senchal, one may purchase anything one desires, including the bodies of the recently deceased. Because of this, necromancy is especially easy to practice in Elsweyr.

    NORDS VIEW ON DEATH
    Nords have believed their souls will travel to Sovngarde since even before they departed Atmora. This realm lies in the heart of Aetherius, awaiting the souls of departed warriors. Nords who prove themselves in battle awaken in the realm after death. Nords are judged not by the manner in which they lived, but the manner in which they die. In the end, all valiant Nords can enter Sovngarde, despite dismemberment, decapitation or evisceration.

    The Hall of Valor is a massive stone mead hall located in Sovngarde in which Nord heroes are welcomed to be forever honored by Shor. The hall can only be accessed by crossing the huge Whale Bone bridge which is guarded by Tsun, the shield-thane of Shor. The hall can only be entered by defeating him in a challenge or unless granted permission from Shor. Pain and illness vanish within the Hall of Valor. Revelry is never-ending, mead flows freely, and the greatest Nords of all time compete in tests of strength and prowess. Even the tedium of immortality is unknown, for spectral foes wait in the surrounding shadows, waiting to do battle with those who would test their mettle.

    Nords' souls of those who die peacefully, executed or murdered will pass to Aetherius, in company of the other Divines, instead of traveling to Sovngarde.

    Shor is the Nordic version of Lorkhan. Before his doom, Shor, sometimes called the "Children's God", was chief of the gods. Shor created the realm of Sovngarde before he died. After he was murdered, Shor retreated to that realm to rule over it, choosing heroes to honor according to his whims. Shor is for the Nords both the missing god of creation and the king of the dead. There are many ancient Nordic legends of Shor and his compatriots. Kyne was his wife and later his widow, Stuhn was one of his Shield-thanes, and Tsun died protecting him. They say he fought Alduin on the spirit plane at the beginning of time. However, it is also true that Alduin feeds on the souls of the dead in Sovngarde, a privilege he guards jealously.


    Most Nord cities have a Hall of the Dead, the way the Nords call their mausoleums, and where bodies are interred, overseen by a Priest of Orkey or Arkay, depending on the era, who ensures that corpses are properly consecrated and cared for. Priests are trained to prepare and inter the corpses of the dead and to learn the proper burial rituals and prayers, sometimes, since they were children. A Priest of Arkay in Skyrim is usually entrusted with a ceremonial dagger once they've completed their training, given by the head priest who sanctified the ritual. Ceremonial daggers and other tools were used by the Nords of old to embalm the bodies, a practice forgotten by the Fourth Era. Besides that dagger, each priest holds an amulet of Arkay which allows them to appease the restless dead who sometimes arise from their tombs. Arkay or Orkey priests in Skyrim usually live solitary lives and are seen as little more than outcasts.

    Smaller Nord settlements and some cities may have graveyards where their dead are buried with the same rites as those from the Hall of the Dead. Each grave is marked by a gravestone and bodies are encased in coffins. Sometimes the burial has to wait for the ground to thaw, due to harsh climate of Skyrim, but also the cold prevents the bodies from rotting quickly.

    Prestigious Nord clans may also have their own barrows outside of cities. These tombs are watched by their own relatives, keeping out intruders and tending to their dead. This tradition dates, at least, to the very beginning of Nords' colonization of Tamriel and continued until, at least, the Second Era. Highly esteemed Nords, like honored warriors, jarls, and kings of old had their own barrow, commonly in secluded places, far from populated places.

    Some Nords may choose a Fire Burial, instead of interring themselves. Reasons may differ, but they are an uncommon choice, but not despised at all. This ritual involves the cremation of the body of the deceased and the consecration of the ashes by a priest, to secure their souls to depart to the afterlife.

    ORCS VIEW ON DEATH
    According to Malacath-worshipping Orcs, Boethiah took exception to the lies being spread by the elven gods about Lorkhan, most especially those espoused by Trinimac. He defeated Trinimac and took on his form to spread "the truth of Lorkhan's test", the Tri-Angled Truth, and persuaded the followers of Boethiah and Trinimac to abandon Altmeri society. Then, Malacath was created when Boethiah ate Trinimac, although Malacath himself says that this tale is far too "literal minded". Trinimac's devout elven followers became the Orsimer. Malacath is not recognized as a Daedric Lord by his peers, which fits his sphere perfectly.

    Some Orcs disagree with both stories and claim that Trinimac still exists and Malacath is a separate Daedric entity. At least two kings of Orsinium have tried to convert the Orcs back to the Aedric faith of Trinimac. Trinimac is particularly well-known for spreading what is today one of the main understanding of the events surrounding Lorkhan. He preached that Lorkhan's idea for the mortal realm had been a trick all along and fomented war against Lorkhan and his followers. He believed that "tears were the best response to the Sundering", and encouraged hatred of Lorkhan.

    For the Orcs that revere Malacath, the afterlife promises rewards of immortality, abundant food and drink, and constant battle deep within the Ashen Forge. The Ashen Forge represents the culmination of the three constant truths of life among the Orc clans: the stronghold, the grudge, and the Code of Malacath. The Ashen Forge sits at the center of Malacath's own stronghold in the Ashpit, Malacath's plane of Oblivion, which consists of nothing but dust and smoke and ash. But his followers believe that the eternal emptiness contains all the things they hold dear and deem necessary to enhance their immortal existence. As the ultimate expression of the Orc stronghold, Malacath's Ashpit bastion stretches endlessly across the planes, extending even behind the stars to Aetherius, granting access to every worthy Orc who crosses from this life into the next. In Malacath's stronghold, every Orc is a chief, every chief has a thousand wives, and every wife has a thousand slaves to cater to their every need. The stronghold's walls rise one hundred feet into the smoky sky, constructed of polished steel and worked iron. Inside the walls, stone keeps, iron towers, and massive longhouses surround the central square that houses the Ashen Forge.

    The Ashen Forge fills the endless space within Malacath's smithy, a massive hearth that burns with a fire said to be hotter than the sun. The thing that keeps this fire alive is the adherence by the Orcs of Tamriel to the Code of Malacath, that is the heat comes from the burning, white-hot coals that are, the literal manifestation of the bloody code, which fuels the fires of emptiness, betrayal, and broken promises, imbuing every newly forged Orc with a foundation of grievances and resentments that will take them far in the mortal world. The hope is that every generation will be better than the next thanks to the efforts of the generation before it and its ability to adhere to and follow the Code of Malacath. Within this fire, every Orc must undergo the ritual of tempering when first they cross from this life to the next. They are thrust into the coals so that every grudge that they carry into the afterlife can be heated, melted, and eventually forged into the next generation of mortal Orcs. Some particularly memorable grudges can also be hammered and worked into weapons or armor of legendary stature upon the Ashen Anvil, the gigantic workbench that stands beside the Ashen Forge.

    Still, Malacath's faithful believe that they will be rewarded with immortality, nourishment, and constant battle deep within the Ashen Forge. A life-everlasting filled with endless days of warfare, endless nights of fine food and drink, and ongoing opportunities to prove their toughness and demonstrate the quality of their steel. Orcish spirit-legions serve and fight for Malacath in the Ashpit. Dremora of the Doomdriven clan are known to serve as marshals and commanders for the Orcish legionnaires.

    In contrast, Trinimac's followers believe that when they die, they ascend to Aetherius to join with their ancestors. Afterlife for Trinimac's faithful also consists of endless war and celebrations, but with a greater emphasis on once again spending time with family members who came before them.

    Orcs possess a unique spiritual element, that allows memories, and hopes to come together to form a spiritual totem, that is not only a clan totem but the very embodiment of a clan. Through the concept of fellowship, unity, and familial bonding, an Orc clan can form this unique spiritual connection. The Kalmur clan is the only known clan to have practiced this concept, and their familial love for one another and their kinship allowed for the manifestation of Atrozu, their clan totem.


    Both Malacath and Trinimac followers share cremation as their main funerary practice.

    When an Orc dies, his remains will be burned down to ashes, which can be handled by their kin. Ashes from chiefs and kings usually are forged into swords and shields, or any other item which their relatives or successors may want to remember the departed ones. Commonly, more than one deceased was cremated at a time.

    It is custom to place the ashes of the Orcish dead under a cairn, out in the field, under the open sky. Over this cairn are placed their arms and armor. There, their relatives will come to honor their ancestors. Burial is not a practice among the Orsimer, although they respect other races' traditions.

    Sorrow mountain is the tallest peak in the Wrothgarian Mountains. The ancient Orcs of the early First Era used its heights as a burial ground for their chiefs and champions; the mightier the chief, the higher the Orcs placed his cairn. Torug gro-Igron, one of their greatest heroes, had his cairn at the very summit of Sorrow.

    A unique and uncommon example of burial among Orcs and proof of their respect of other races killed in battle is the catacombs of Honor's Rest, in southern Wrothgar. This extensive mausoleum was built by Orc, Breton and Redguard masons after the destruction of the First Orsinium to place the corpses of both Breton and Redguards and the ashes of the Orcs who died in the long siege and, specially to place the rests of the heroes and rivals Baloth Bloodtusk and Gaiden Shinji, whose spoiled duel by King Joile of Daggerfall ended the war. These ruins were hidden and undiscovered until the reign of King Kurog in the Second Era.

    Orcish corpses are among the most sought after for the durability of their skin and the strength of their bones by necromancers. During the reign of King Gortwog, a delegation from the Worm Cult was sent to Orsinium for disposing of the Orcish dead. However, these negotiations never came into any agreement. Probably, because Orsimer despise any form of necromancy or disturbance of corpses, souls, or remains of the dead.

    REACHMENS VIEW ON DEATH
    Reachmen primarily worship Hircine, the most primal of the Daedric Princes, although some clans are said to also dedicate ceremonies to Molag Bal, Malacath, Mehrunes Dagon, and Namira. Their shamans venerate the Hagraven "matrons", who in turn grant them knowledge of nature magic. It is unknown if their souls are claimed by any of those Daedric Princes to their realms.

    Reachfolk do not fear death but understand the value of a fleeting life and believe that no matter the struggle, one should not go quietly into death. Lorkh represents a will to live despite of the certainty of death. They believe everyone deserves to be able to die under the open sky, rahter than hidden in darkness. They believe that any death has significance, no matter how great or small.

    Namira, who is known as the Spirit Queen, the Goddess of Death, and the Black Fly, is a revered spirit in the Reachman pantheon that represents darkness, endings, and rebirth. She is seen as the sovereign of the infinite world of spirit, one of the two worlds of existence. The Reachfolk creation story speaks of Lorkh having an epiphany when he visited the darkness; that which is perceived as nothingness is ripe for possibility. And so, Lorkh approached Namira and convinced her to grant him a place in the infinite void to create a realm for wayward spirits, but it was not without a cost. Lorkh sacrificed himself to create a harsh realm, one that is unforgiving and intended to teach through suffering. Hircine took the mantle of Lorkh's creation, becoming the sovereign the second world: the realm of flesh. The Reachfolk believe that Hircine will fight alongside them at the "end of all days".

    Hircine and Namira's roles complement each other. While Reachfolk dwell in the world of the living, Hircine is a guide that helps them navigate Nirn's hardships. Upon death, Namira acts as a psychopomp for Reachman souls that gives and takes lives, until their spirits are enlightened. Thus, Namira is seen as the avatar of primal dualisms, such as beginnings and ends, which stem from her world of spirit. At the "end of all days", Hircine will fight alongside the Reachmen, and Lorkh's Dark Heart will beat again, reawakened by feeding on the deaths of mortals, and its darkness will spread from its depths to consume everything, sparing only Namira's faithful.

    Hircine engenders a sense of urgency; the unease needed to keep the people of the Reach safe, as there may be another threat looming over the horizon. Thus, Hircine has reason to be cruel in his lessons. He also taught the Reachfolk how to hunt, fight, and survive, all in an effort to make them swifter, stronger, and more cunning. The briarheart ritual is reflective of this need to improve, and involves communing with Hircine to ritualistically replace the heart of a skilled Reachfolk warrior with poisoned briars. Reachfolk religion puts a huge emphasis on the concepts of the suffering and self-sacrifice and this ritual in particular represents Lorkh's immortal sacrifice, which is reflected by an act of self sacrifice - ending ones' own life for the protection of their loved ones, with the end result being that the warrior is resurrected as a living weapon with great strength and endurance at the cost of the feeling of the unending, constant pain. These warriors are called "Briarhearts".


    Reachfolk of various clans typicaly wear amulets, talismans or other trinkets connected to their unerstanding of the death. Wildblood Clan members are responsible for crafting their own talisman which is is unique to that person and their family. It represents the relationship between hunter and prey, and is deeply personal to their beliefs about life and death. Those talismans are an important part of guiding their loved one's spirit home and are kept by living relatives of the deceased. Bear-Heart Clan also fashioned similar trinkets. Amulets that belonged to the deceased who were banished from the clan are buried it on the banks of the Karth River in order to bring peace to the spirit of the fallen. This belief is shared by at least some Reachfolk who are not part of those clans.

    It is known that they share the funerary practice of burial with their Nord neighbours, Breton cousins and Nedic forefathers. Warriors of the Spiritblood who felt defending the ways of their ancestors are honored by having Totems of the Brave erected in their honor. They were also granted immortality in form of the vateshran song that was was passed down and sung forever. Cairns are scattered across the landscape of the Reach and some of them are known to be erected by the Reachfolk in places where blood of their brethren was spilled and are often used as grave markers. In certain circumstances cremation is also performed.

    Although the accounts on Reachfolk burial practices are sparse the burial of the legendary hero of the Reach Faolan is described in detail. Mortally wounded or dead Red Eagle was carried by the weeping cortege up the crag at dawn. Reachfolk followed with pots of resin and ash in order to prepare his body for burial. Ashes were scattered to lay upon his body which was exposed to the chiefs of numerous clans. According to Reachfolk ceremony was interrupted by Hag who took the briarheart from Faolan's chest despite the protests of the attendants. Once she left the ceremony continued and he was carried into the deep cave in the heart of the mountain which was a place of a prepared tomb and then he was "laid bare for the last time in sleepless rest" in the tomb. The stone was sealed, wax poured and flints shattered. After the burial numerous traps were set to dissuade intruders and grave robbers. The resting place appeared unadorned at first but in the deeper parts of the tomb the rippled rock walls were replaced by ornate man made walls of hewn stone and covered with chiseled murals depicting scenes of Red Eagle's final battle. Despite the rich ornamentation of the room and later parts of the corridor that led to it the sarcophagus placed on dais in the central part of the chamber was simple and unadorned. Faolan was buried with his legendary weapon - Red Eagle's Bane, which was put on a pedestal near to his body.

    REDGUARDS VIEW ON DEATH
    Tu'whacca, before the creation of the world, was the god of Nobody Really Cares. When Tall Papa undertook the creation of the Walkabout, Tu'whacca found a purpose; he became the caretaker of the Far Shores, and continues to help Redguards find their way into the afterlife. His cult is sometimes associated with Arkay in the more cosmopolitan regions of Hammerfell, and he is often worshipped in that name by some Forebears. However, Crown and Forebear Redguards' beliefs about the afterlife have been and are the same since their arrivals from Yokuda. They all believe Tu'whacca is the god who escorts their souls to the afterlife of the Far Shores and, though a soul may have enemies who may try to keep it from reaching the Far Shores, Tu'whacca, as is sly and clever, will always outwit them. In conclusion, Tu'whacca performs the same functions for the Redguards that Arkay and Xarxes do for Tamrielic men and mer.

    The actual portal to the Far Shores is located deep in the Hall of Heroes, the ancient resting place of the greatest Redguard warriors. Worthy souls must journey to the Chamber of Passage, guarded by the Keeper of the Hall, who refuses entry to the living and the unworthy.

    In Yokudan and Redguard religion, Sep, the Snake, their version of Lorkhan was born when Tall Papa created someone to help him regulate the spirit trade. Sep, though, was driven crazy by the hunger of Satakal, and he convinced some of the gods to help him make an easier alternative to the Walkabout, that is Nirn, and the spirits who followed Sep become trapped there, to live out their lives as mortals. Sep is punished by Tall Papa for his transgressions, but his hunger lives on as a void in the stars, a "non-space" that tries to upset mortal entry into the Far Shores. Unlike other humans, whose myths portray Mundus as a blessing, the Redguards believe that it was all part of a cruel trick by Ruptga's servant, Sep, whose hunger had driven him into a malevolent madness. As a result of his trickery, their ancestors were left stranded on a dying ball, too far away to "jump into" the Far Shores. Ruptga refused to help those who had been stranded by Sep, declaring that they had to either live on through children or else find a new way to reach the Far Shores and thereby "strive back to godhood".


    When the Ra Gada arrived in Hammerfell, they were determined to reproduce the culture of Yokuda as closely as possible, so they do with their funerary practices. Redguards inherited a tremendous respect for their deceased ancestors, so it is easy to find that their houses for the dead can be even larger and more elaborate than their homes for the living. They build extensive necropolis both near and far from populated places, for commoners, nobility, heroes, and kings alike. Although, sometimes, noble families or wealthy kings will build their own tombs in secluded places and protect them with traps, and magical and holy seals. Redguards have buried and mummified their dead since their arrival to Tamriel from Yokuda. Honorless criminals are left to rot in desecrated grounds, commonly out in the desert, far from towns. It is possible to retrieve the remains and consecrate them if they were later believed innocent.

    Throne Keepers are Tu'whacca priests who are intended with protecting the many necropolises which dot Hammerfell. Their main occupation is tending to the embalmed bodies which are entombed and to prevent the others to rise. In case their necropolis turned desecrated, they can call upon Tu'whacca's Breath, a sacred ritual which put the dead back to rest. They are capable too of cleansing necromantic taint on the Ansei Wards which keeps the dead of the Alik'r Desert from rising.

    According to Redguard tradition, striking the dead, called Ra-Netu locally, carries with it a terrible curse and is considered an act of dishonor. Because of this, fighting back against necromancy proved difficult. Worship of Tu'whacca is very strong, the dead are almost always subject to his protections, identical to Arkay's Law. There are exceptions after large battles or in remote areas where death occurs far from meddlesome priests. To a devout Redguard, almost nothing is more repugnant than necromancy. Due to these beliefs, Redguard reanimated necromancers, such as liches, will be imprisoned under magical seals that kept them trapped, instead of being destroyed.

    Furthermore, in the Alik'r, three Ansei heroes of ancient, Majah, Radan and Halelah sacrificed themselves to protect the region from the risen dead. As part of a covenant with Tu'whacca, they pledged their souls and each Ansei channeled their spirit into the blade they wielded in life. These swords became known as the Ansei Wards, and as long as the dead are consecrated in the name of Tu'whacca, they could not be raised by even the most powerful necromancy. The Wards were locked in a fortified subterranean storehouse below Sentinel, known as the Impervious Vault, and sealed with a magical barrier. The spirit of each Ansei remained tied to their Ward, meaning it would be with it at all times. These treasured relics have played an important role throughout the history of the Alik'r.

    However, necromancers have achieved to practice their art in a variety of manners, so the Ash'abah were created as a separated tribal group of Redguards who are pariahs from the rest of society due to their delegated role: fighting the undead. They will fight back, at a cost: they are hated by other Redguards, and exiled to the desert. When the dead rise, the Ash'abah are called upon to help, but otherwise they are shunned.

    OTHER VIEWS ON DEATH
    Little is known about afterlife beliefs and funerary customs of most of the nations of Akavir, of the Falmer, of the Maormer, and of many less-cultured beastfolks like the Imga, the Lamia, the Minotaurs, and the Water Dreugh. However, I can list those more obscure races that we are familiar with in terms of death and funeral customs:

    Ayleids:
    Aedric-worshipping Ayleids had very similar traditions on death and afterlife to that of the Altmer. At least some Ayleid cities believed their souls voyaged to the afterlife of Aetherius. The White-Gold Tower was their "Temple of the Ancestors", built it in emulation of the Adamantine Tower, and with Chim-el-Adabal, which they believed to be the crystallized blood of the Heart of Lorkhan, into the tower's Founding-Stone. It is the site where the Ten Ancestors, statues sacred to the Ayleids, were traditionally held. They were spread to various other settlements during the siege of the White-Gold Tower for safekeeping, but were not reunited again until the late Third Era, long after the fall of the Ayleids. Little is known if those Ayleids who worship Daedric Princes shared customs with their brethren.

    Dragons:
    Although dragons are "immortal", they can be killed temporarily. Most dragons were hunted down during the Dragon War or by the Blades after their arrival in Tamriel. These dragons were entombed in burial mounds constructed in the First Era by surviving members of the dragon cult.

    Giants:
    Giants demonstrate intricate beliefs regarding death. They have places set aside as sacred burial grounds. When a giant is sick or dying, they go to one of these places to die. If a giant dies elsewhere, other giants make sure the body gets to the burial ground. They typically don't live near these sacred locations, and they don't guard them. They simply make use of them.

    Ogres and Goblins:
    Malacath is worshipped by Ogres and Goblins under the name Muluk. However, it is unknown if they follow the Code of Malacath and have similar funerary customs and afterlife beliefs to the Orcs or not.

    Sload:
    Sload are apparently not religious and generally reject worship, but will willingly serve Daedra if they benefit from it. Sload parents care little for the fate of the young, and will often kill them to make Sload Soap, which they use in necromantic rituals. It is unknown whether or not the death of an adult Sload is treated differently.

    Tsaesci:
    Tsaesci bury their dead with burial masks with serpent and dragon motifs. Ancestor worship seems to be an integral part of Tsaesci culture. Water occupies a special place in the Tsaesci faith, as they believe that all waterways connect the realms of the dead and the living.

    The Proving Festival is an important, yearly holiday of the Tsaesci to appease the ancestors and prove one's worth. It consists of three proofs which a participant has to pass: The first is the Proof of Reverence by which the ancestors are invoked and invited to enter the living world as spirits. The inhabitants of Hakoshae, imperial descendants of Tsaesci, let a paper lotus be carried down a river. The lotus symbolically swims into the realm of the dead to attract the attention of the ancestors. The second proof is the Proof of Strength. It serves to show the ancestors ones strength and that one can resist various dangers. The last proof is the Proof of Wisdom. Traditionally it consisted of scholars drafting grand essays, writers composing ornate poems or philosophers performing lengthy debates. However in Hakoshae the inhabitants use riddles for that purpose.


    With regards to immortality, something of a prominent point in Elder Scrolls, there are a variety of means to achieve it, yet all come with a distinct and hard paying price.

    For lack of a better term, the title of ‘lesser undead’ can be used to describe beings such as simple revenants, such as mindless skeletons or zombies, whilst restless spirits often remain bound to Tamriel as ghosts or wraiths. However, these are usually tied to Tamriel by horrific and disastrous events that causes the soul to have unfinished business and/or desire to continue an unresolved matter from their mortal life, leaving them in a state of limbo and unable to move on.

    The most powerful mages have been known to live far beyond a normal mortal lifespan. The most famous examples are the Wizard-Lords of Great House Telvanni, who have been known to live for centuries. Delving into the even more obscure, Sotha Sil, Vivec and Almalexia were able to extend their lives through the continued use of the Heart of Lorkhan, whilst it also granted them exceptional, near godly, abilities; the hearts power also later allowed Dagoth Ur to resurrect himself from the dead – though such information is known during the second era.
    A Breton wizard of legend known as The Sage is also known to have achieved immortality via alchemy, making them something of an idol for alchemists in Tamriel.

    Necromancers often attempt to use their knowledge to cheat death, although only the most powerful of necromancers manage to ascend to lichdom, which often becomes a curse in very short order for those who succeed. Another way mortals avoid a natural death is contracting vampirism.

    During the Merethic Era, Dragon Priests kept the Nord population enthralled and obedient by means of a widespread dragon-worshipping cult, and many people of this era became the undead draugr that still prowl the crypts of Skyrim, Solstheim, Atmora, and anywhere else the dragon priests "kept peace between dragons and men".



    Edited by Sanguiness130 on January 24, 2022 5:49PM
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    PART ONE: TYPES OF LESSER DAEDRA

    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Daedra

    The word "Daedra" is of Aldmeri origin, and roughly means "not our ancestors", as opposed to Aedra—"ancestors". Technically, only the plural is written "Daedra", but this word is frequently used in singular as well. The proper singular form is "Daedroth", but that has come to refer to a specific species of Daedra. Different cultures have their own myths and names for Daedra, as well. The study of Daedra is referred to as Daedrology. Likewise, those who study Daedra are called "Daedrologists."

    Daedra are sometimes referred to as demons, but this is misleading. All Daedra have a penchant for extremes and are therefore capable of tremendous acts of devastation, but their different spheres make them apply their power in different ways, and their infinite diversity makes speaking about them generally difficult. Thus, it is often impossible to accurately label them as "good" or "evil"; the one thing that can be stated with certainty is the Daedra are beyond mortal comprehension (as mortals seem to be beyond Daedric comprehension).

    Daedra come in many forms. Undoubtedly there are true Daedra (called Greater Daedra), such as the Daedra Princes, Demiprinces, and highly intelligent Dremora. There are many lesser beings known to be in league with these greater powers, but whether each type constitutes actual Daedra is unknown.

    A Daedroth's physical form can be ruined, but it cannot be truly killed; the soul (more specifically known as the animus or vestige) of a slain Daedroth returns to the void of Oblivion until it manages to coalesce into a physical form again. A slain Daedroth is often said to have been "banished" or "purged" instead of "killed" to reflect this. It is not known what happens to a Daedra killed in Aetherius, though it has been suggested that this may be the one way to permanently kill a Daedra. Septima Tharn put this theory to the test when she lured the Vestige to the Far Shores in an attempt to permanently destroy the hero. While in Aetherius, the Vestige was separated from their soul, which was trapped in Coldharbour. Septima Tharn believed that if she managed to kill the Vestige in the Far Shores, the hero wouldn't have been able to resurrect themselves, effectively dooming them. A way of permanently disposing of a Daedra or Daedra Lord does exist; this is done by binding a portion of their energy to an object such as a skull. This prevents their return, and they cannot reform unless the essence is freed from the object.

    Daedra are great imitators, and their creations are described as mimicking things found on Nirn in an outlandish or even corrupted way. They are capable of creating seemingly indestructible and mighty Daedric armor and weaponry through dark rituals. The Daedric Princes have also created several species of daedra that resemble species found on Nirn. The Beetles, Scorpions, Wasps, and Spiders from Mephala's Spiral Skein and the Crows from the Nocturnal's Evergloam are the more blatant examples of Daedric imitations of animals from Nirn.

    The Daedric Princes are only the most powerful of the Daedra, and many of them have many servants known generally as lesser Daedra (not to be confused with Lesser Daedra, a specific type of Daedra similar to Daedroths). Even though many lesser Daedra are associated with a Daedric Prince in particular, in reality, any individual Daedroth can serve any Daedric Prince by taking part in an "Oath Bond" while others stay unaligned, though the specifics are characteristically unknown. Some are in service to mortals. For example, the Dunmer have been known to use Daedra as servants and instruments, as have many other cultures, and the Ayleids employed entire armies of Daedra in their wars against men. Daedra are often summoned and used in the study of Magic; of course, the school of Conjuration deals specifically with connecting one's mind with a Daedroth and compelling its appearance in the mortal plane. For information on mortals summoning such Daedra, see the book Darkest Darkness.


    The following are the known types of Lesser Daedra:

    • Atronachs (Elemental Daedra)
    • Aurorans
    • Banekin
    • Clannfear
    • Crow Daedra
    • Daedra Seducers
    • Daedric Titans
    • Dark Seducers
    • Daedrats
    • Daedric Horses
    • Daedroths
    • Doppelgangers
    • Dremora
    • Dro-m'Athra (disputed)
    • Fiendroth
    • Fire Daemons
    • Golden Saints
    • Grievous Twilights
    • Harvesters
    • Havocrels
    • Hell Hounds
    • Hernes
    • Hoarvor Daedra
    • Hungers
    • Huntsmen
    • Imps (disputed)
    • Knights of Order (disputed)
    • Lesser Daedra
    • Lurkers
    • Morphoid Daedra
    • Nightmare Animals
    • Nocturnal Shrikes
    • Ogrims
    • Ruinachs
    • Scamps
    • Seekers
    • Skaafin
    • Spider Daedra
    • Spiderkith
    • Spiderlings
    • Vermai
    • Watchers
    • Winged Twilights
    • Wraith-of-Crows
    • Xivilai
    • Xivkyn

    For more detailed information on each lesser daedra please see the lore source linked below the title and the Beastiary section on such page, the links are there to be followed for each.


    Edited by Sanguiness130 on November 28, 2021 1:26AM
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    PART TWO: VAMPIRES


    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Vampire

    A vampire is a preternatural being, commonly believed to be a reanimated corpse, which consumes the blood of sleeping persons at night, thralls, and other victims. The vampires of Tamriel are undead, diseased persons who are hated, hunted, and misunderstood by the living. Whether they consider themselves cursed or blessed, or whether they have given into their animalistic instincts or have sought to rid the world of the disease, vampires are nonetheless considered abominations. Though it's possible for a vampire to find a cure, knowledge of how to do so has been suppressed in many places due to the fear that it would encourage people to deliberately infect themselves.

    The vampire is one of the most powerful and feared of all the undead. While they are typically incredibly fast, gifted mages, and unnaturally strong, fear of vampires is abnormally great due to their ability to infect others, a fate often described as worse than death. Distrust and chaos can potentially bring down entire settlements should just one vampire infiltrate the populace. Vampires spread by giving mortals diseases such as Porphyric Hemophilia, Sanguinare Vampiris, and Noxiphilic Sanguivoria. Vampires tend to be organized into many different clans; in fact, there are over a hundred distinct kinds of vampire in Tamriel.

    The daedric prince Molag Bal, whose sphere is the domination and enslavement of mortals, is widely known as the “father” to all vampire kin, as he was the one to originally create the vampiric disease(s). This does not mean that all vampires worship Molag Bal, but its undeniable that the vampire origin started with this very daedric prince.


    Note:
    It also is worth noting that the following descriptions apply more towards roleplay, as the game mechanics cause different strains of vampirism to be the chosen vampirism of the game (depending on which Elder Scrolls game you play). In ESO's case, Lamae Bal's line, otherwise known as Noxiphilic Sanguivoria, is the in game vampire skill, but that doesn't mean you're limited to roleplaying only vampires from that bloodline!


    GENERAL STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES OF VAMPIRES
    To start out, it’s quite important to write the normal strengths and weaknesses for all vampires.

    REMEMBER: If a bloodline is more magic focused rather than physical focused, their physical strengths are likely to be not be as prominent as they could be in other bloodlines.
    E.g. a strain that is more prominent in dealing elemental damage will likely not be as physically strong as someone from a bloodline with a focus towards physical strength.

    They are as follows:

    Strengths
    - Enhanced strength, agility and health regeneration.
    - Immortality, they do not age (but can still be killed by violent means).
    - A supernatural resistance towards all normal weaponry besides silver.
    - The removal of the need to breath.
    - No longer needing food or drink by regular standards. Replaced instead by an intolerable desire for the consumption of blood.
    - Immunity to both poison and disease.
    - The ability to infect others with their own bloodline.
    - Higher sneaking and magical capabilities.
    - Hunters Sight: An ability that allows vampires to discern mortals from undead (such as other vampires) from each other, but only when the sight is active.

    Weaknesses
    - Some form of weakness towards the sun.
    - Immense weakness to fire that is matched only by sunlight.
    - Disfigurement, some bloodlines appear more monstrous than others.
    - Widespread hatred across the entirety of Tamriel, and the threat of being killed on sight in most places, especially in Morrowind.
    - They are undead; their bodies are as dead and cold as a corpse. Which means all vampires also are detectable through detect undead spells.
    - The need to feed on blood from others, if they do not they will either go berserk and lose control over themselves, or go into a comatose.
    - Their souls are owned by Molag Bal, and will go to Coldharbour upon death.

    These are the general benefits and weaknesses vampires get upon being sired, regardless of their bloodline.

    Below I shall list the types of vampirism strains that are known in Tamriel.

    DAUGHTERS OF COLDHARBOUR
    When talking about vampires, it’s very important to mention what is considered some of the most powerful, and high-ranked vampires in Tamriel’s history.

    Women who have been *** by Molag Bal, and survived the horrifying ordeal will be granted a droplet of blood from Molag Bal himself. This very blood infects their body with one of the many vampiric diseases. Molag Bal is then known to leave them to die, but only so they can rise as Daughters of Coldharbour. This far we know of three Daughters of Coldharbour, the first of which is Lamae Beolfag, but better known as Lamae Bal, who is the first ever vampire to be created in Tamriel’s history.

    The documented Daughters of Coldharbour we know of:
    - Lamae Beolfag/Lamae Bal (Elder Scrolls Online and the lore book: Opusculus Lamae Bal ta Mezzamortie)
    - Valerica (Skyrim, Dawnguard expansion)
    - Serana (Skyrim, Dawnguard expansion)

    PURE BLOOD VAMPIRES
    While it’s important to note that the Daughters of Coldharbour are also pure-blooded vampires, few mortal men have been granted vampirism directly from Molag Bal himself, by tons of sacrifices and faithful devotion. These are just pure-blooded vampires, and not the unique Daughters of Coldharbour.

    While the degradation of the vampire bloodlines is not documented in Tamriel’s history, it’s widely believed that the vampire disease degrades through generation to generation, becoming weaker, and granting the vampire less power. This is hinted at by Lord Harkon, who was made a pure-blooded vampire through the sacrifices of a thousand men, and giving his wife and child, Valerica and Serana to pleasure Molag Bal. In return, Molag Bal granted Lord Harkon the same pure-blooded vampirism as his wife and child had received.

    NOXIPHILIC SANGUIVORIA
    Noxiphilic Sanguivoria is first vampire bloodline in Tamriel’s history. The Progenitor of this bloodline is Lamae Bal, who is also known as the Blood Matron to her fellow kindred. Noxiphilic Sanguivoria, interestingly enough, is the only bloodline without any form of weakness to the sun. Instead, these vampires’ abilities are simply enhanced at night. This bloodline can sneak faster, turn into a mere mist and even summon a swarm of bats to aid them. The bloodline seems to completely lack any social powers, like vampiric seduction. However, it’s worth noting that Lamae claims that her kin are living amongst the mortals as nobles, so it’s only fair to assume that the bloodline can hide themselves well enough in mortal society.

    VOLKIHAR/SANGUINARE VAMPIRIS
    Lord Harkon, Serana and Valerica are known as the progenitors of Sanguinare Vampiris. While the pure-blooded vampires of this particular disease are known to be members of the Volkihar clan, that does not mean all are, as the disease has been spread widely across Skyrim. Vampires of Sanguinare Vampiris are not strongly harmed by direct sunlight, but are weakened by it. They cannot regenerate, and will find themselves severely weakened in stamina, magicka and healthy prowess. They possess the ability to reanimate the dead to fight alongside them, see better in the dark, seducing and tricking the minds of mortals and even the ability to turn invisible to the naked eye. Some of the older vampires in this bloodline have found themselves with greater disfigurement as well, and the first and second generation vampires can even utilize the powers of the mighty Vampire-Lord form.

    CYRODIIL VAMPYRUM ORDER/PORPHYRIC HEMOPHILIA
    While the progenitor of this bloodline is not certain, this bloodline honours two patrons, Molag Bal and Clavicus Vile. This bloodline in particular is known to be well hidden amongst the mortal men and women, and is also the dominant vampire bloodline in Cyrodiil. They owe their social capabilities to Clavicus Vile, as it was he who made them withstand the sun, and allow them to walk amongst men and women unnoticed. These vampires are able to see better in the dark, seducing and tricking the minds of mortals, putting weak-willed mortals into instant fear, and turning invisible. Whilst well-fed within a twenty-four hour period, these vampires can walk unharmed in the sun, and look entirely normal like their mortal self. But after the twenty-four hour mark passes, these vampires will start to burn in the sun, and start to attain many of the vampire’s typical visual features, like red eyes and paler skin. They are also known to oppose any other vampiric bloodline.

    QUARRA/PORPHYRIC HEMOPHILIA
    This vampire bloodline is known to fear nothing, and they are also considered to be physically stronger than most other bloodlines. While little is actually known about them, they burn in the sun regardless of being well-fed or not, and are unable to regenerate health through other means that by the use of Vampire’s Touch, which drains health through magical means from the victim. They are known to exist on Vvardenfell. Due to the uncertainty of the Quarra bloodlines origin point, and it's first known member (Volrina Quarra) being mortal as of the Elder Scrolls Online period, choosing this bloodline to play should be done carefully. It would also not be known as the 'Quarra' bloodline at this time, and probably referred to unspecifically.

    BERNE/PORPHYRIC HEMOPHILIA
    This vampire bloodline is known to be sneakier and better predators in the night than other bloodlines. They are very agile, and they are even said to be invisible in shadows and supernaturally gifted in unarmed combat. While little else is known about them, they are unable to regenerate health from other means but Vampire’s Touch, which drains the life from the victim, and they also burn immediately from the suns touch. They are known to exist on Vvardenfell.

    AUNDAE/PORPHYRIC HEMOPHILIA
    A bloodline solely consisting of Altmer, these vampires are greatly gifted in the arts of magic, and the manipulation of the darker powers of the mind. While little is known about them, just like the Berne and Quarra bloodlines, these vampires burns immediately from the sun’s touch, and cannot regenerate health from other means than Vampire’s Touch. They are known to exist on Vvardenfell.

    WHET-FANG
    While little is known about this bloodline, it’s one that thrives in the region of Black Marsh. These vampires in particular are well known for capturing their victims alive, and putting them into a magicka-induced coma, so the vampire can feed on them whenever they like.

    ANTHOTIS
    Little is known about them, besides that they have shown superior intellect in comparison to other bloodlines. They also appear in Hammerfell.

    GARLYTHI
    The only notable power of this bloodline is their ability to shield themselves magically. The bloodline appears to be found in the province of High Rock.

    HAARVENU
    This bloodline is particularly gifted in elemental damage, from the Destruction school of magic. Little else is known, besides that they reside in High Rock.

    KHULARI
    A bloodline operating in Hammerfell, this bloodline is gifted with the ability to easily paralyze their prey, through means which are unknown.

    LYREZI
    This bloodline can be found in the province of High Rock, and are able to turn invisible and silence their enemies with ease.

    MONTALION
    These vampires are gifted with the ability to cure paralysis, and are able to teleport. Yet again, this bloodline can be found in the province of High Rock.

    SELENU
    This bloodline has found themselves resistant to elemental damage. They also appear in the region of Hammerfell.

    THRAFEY
    The Thrafey have found themselves as greater healers, with their natural ability to heal damaged tissue. Besides that, little else is known, beyond that they can be found in the province of High Rock.

    VRASETH
    The Vraseth are quicker and more agile than most other bloodlines. Yet again, these vampires can be found in the province of High Rock.

    BONSAMU
    The Bonsamu bloodline is hard to detect, and therefore has an easier time being disguised in mortal society. In fact, the only method to reveal their vampiric existence is to hold a candlelight up to their eyes, as that will reveal their true nature. These can be found in the province of Valenwood.

    KEERILTH
    The only notable ability of this clan is their ability to turn into a mist, possibly similar to the Noxiphilic Sanguivoria. The Keerilth bloodline can be found in the province of Valenwood.

    YEKEF
    The Yekef are known for swallowing their prey whole. Besides that, they are known to live in the region of Valenwood.

    TELBOTH
    While little is known about the Telboth bloodline, they are known for one specific trait, to kidnap children, only to take the childrens place in their families, and then slaughter the entire family. While the reason for it is unknown, the bloodline can be found in the province of Valenwood.


    These are the only known bloodlines in Tamriel’s history. However, it is mentioned that there are over one-hundred different vampire bloodlines, so crafting up your own is possible. Just remember to keep it “realistic” and true to the lore.



    Edited by Sanguiness130 on January 6, 2022 5:16PM
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    PART THREE: LYCANTHROPES


    Lore Source: https://en.uesp.net/wiki/Lore:Lycanthropy

    Lycanthropy is a supernatural condition that causes a person to transform into a were-creature: an unnatural crossing between a beast and their original species. Originally created by the Daedric Prince Hircine, it has been called a disease, a curse, and a blessing. Lycanthropy is contagious, and not selective about who it afflicts; most mortal races are susceptible to it.

    There are several known strains of this condition, most of which are specific to certain regions of Tamriel. However, the most common strain—which causes the afflicted to turn into werewolves—is known to occur across the whole of the continent. Strictly speaking, the word "lycanthrope" originally referred only to this strain, but it has long been used to refer to anyone who undergoes a similar beast transformation.

    Lycanthropy, like vampirism, is a Daedric-borne supernatural disease that greatly alters its host and grants unique abilities. Lycanthropy was originally created by Hircine, who bestows it as a "blessing" upon devotees and great hunters. Followers of Hircine can also ritually bestow this blessing upon others, and can even replace vampirism with lycanthropy (the two conditions are apparently mutually exclusive).

    Unlike Molag Bal, Hircine maintains an active role in his creations' existence, as he has been known to personally enhance favored lycanthropes with increased abilities and rewards some with items of power, such as the ring of Hircine which allows a lycanthrope to control his or her transformations. Hircine has even been approached or summoned by packs of werewolves to appoint a pack leader, thus serving as an advisor and an important figure amongst lycanthropes.


    GENERAL STRENGTHS AND WEAKNESSES OF WEREBEASTS

    Strengths
    - Enhanced strength, agility and health regeneration.
    - Longevity. They can live at least 100+ years beyond their races usual limitations.
    - Slowed aging. It has been suggested that werebeasts age slower than normal once they reach maturity, and can remain physically at that age for well beyond natural limitations.
    - A supernatural resistance towards all normal weaponry besides silver.
    - The ability to transform into a beastial figure, in which increases their strength and speed but so does increase their weakness to silver and poison.
    - Immune to disease.
    - The ability to infect others with their own curseform.

    Weaknesses
    - Extreme weakness to poison and silver.
    - Lack of control in early months of condition, emotional states likely to trigger transformation and could result in mass genocide of surrounding population.
    - Immense pain during transformation.
    - Disfigurement, during transformation and in their beastial form they are nothing alike in appearance to their 'normal' selves.
    - Widespread hatred across the entirety of Tamriel, and the threat of being killed on sight in most places, especially in Morrowind.
    - Their souls are owned by Hircine, and will go to the Hunting Grounds upon death.

    Types of Lycanthropes:
    Lycanthropy_Types.png

    Contracting Lycanthropy
    Lycanthropy is also a contagious condition. Close contact with a were-creature can transmit a special disease, which progresses to full-blown lycanthropy within a few days (if untreated). For instance, Sanies Lupinus can be contracted from werewolves, and over time will convert the afflicted into a werewolf. Transmission seems to be brought about through being wounded via the claws or teeth of were-creature, however since most victims are killed, transmission occurs less commonly out of a controlled circumstances.

    Drinking a were-creature's blood is a much more potent means of transmission; it immediately converts the drinker into a lycanthrope. The first transformation occurs within moments, and is unusually intense.

    Finally, there are a few rare families in which lycanthropy is a hereditary condition. It can remain dormant for generations, only to spontaneously reassert itself in later descendants.


    Edited by Sanguiness130 on November 28, 2021 1:24AM
    SANGUINESS
    [EU Server - @Sanguiness ]
    RPer and Lore Geek
  • Sanguiness130
    Sanguiness130
    ✭✭✭
    PART FOUR: THE HUNTERS

    In a time before The Vigilant of Stendarrs and The Dawnguard have come into being, the current lore suggests that right now, no in game supernatural hunters exist, save perhaps you consider the Undaunted but they are more focused on the monster and beastial creatures rather than the 'supernatural'.
    Should Elder Scrolls Online release any in the coming days, months, years, etc. I will be sure to update this section and include them!

    As such we are left to wonder on the RP communities and their hunting guilds/groups.
    Again, with little to no sign of supernatural hunting guilds in the last few years, I will update this section as and when we actually have something for it to display.

    I can only advise this, which is as a supernatural hunter in RP, there are things to be considered like how you would detect them, and how they might behave in response, without metagaming. I can only advise that if this is the path you wish to take in your RP that you maintain a good RP etiquette (all parties involved!) and that everyone has the same rules to abide by, supernaturals and hunters alike, for an RP scenario.


    Edited by Sanguiness130 on November 27, 2021 5:34PM
    SANGUINESS
    [EU Server - @Sanguiness ]
    RPer and Lore Geek
  • Sanguiness130
    Sanguiness130
    ✭✭✭
    my_tweet8.png


    PART ONE: BASIC RP ETIQUETTE


    Before I begin in this, I would firstly like to publicly thank and bow down to the player Snibbers, who may well have forgotten this but many years ago you made a basic version of this guide to help members in a guild we were in. Many years later, with changes made by myself, I would like to share this with the rest of the community in hopes of teaching others the Basic RP etiquette that is not only relevant to games like Elder Scrolls Online but other roleplaying games as well.
    Wherever you are man, I salute you! You inspired something incredible!


    This will be split up into the following sections:

    1. Avoiding “Mary Sue” characters.
    2. Snowflakes.
    3. Character development and goals.
    4. In-Character and Out-of-Character separation.
    5. Metagaming & Godmodding.
    6. Powerplaying.
    7. Actions and Consequences.
    8. Sticking to the Lore.
    9. Descriptive Emotes.
    10. Emote Concision.
    11. Grammar and Punctuation.
    12. Attire and Additionals.


    1. Avoiding Mary-Sue Characters

    Mary-Sue is beautiful. She is intelligent and excels at everything she does. She falls in love with the protagonist, she bakes cakes for the homeless and she has a black belt in karate. Mary-Sue is perfect.

    The Mary-Sue (or Marty-Stu) term has been adopted in roleplaying circles to describe the perfect, powerful, gorgeous and flawless characters. It is very much a negative term, because it describes a character who is too good and too perfect, where a proper character has flaws, weaknesses, bad habits and so on.

    So when you create a character, it is important not only to think of what makes them powerful and amazing, but also what makes them flawed and perhaps even damaged. Well-rounded characters have strengths and weaknesses, so whilst the character may have amazing skills with a sword, they might be terrible when it comes to defending against ranged attacks, and so on. Consider personality flaws; will they be angered by certain races because of prejudice in their backstory? Are they particularly proud or selfish? The list could go on, but the point is, everyone has flaws, and no one is perfect.
    An important note here is that an amazingly powerful character does not equal an amazing character. It is often the underdogs, the black sheep and the undesirables, who turn out to be the most interesting characters.
    You should also not copy a character from already existing stories to be your own in roleplay. You should, by all means, take inspiration from them and make it your own, add and remove parts to their story and change them to suit your preference. It’s also not recommended to blatantly copy existing lore characters, that’s just bad etiquette and widely frowned upon.


    2. Snowflakes

    No two snowflakes are the same and that is where the term (or perhaps slander) comes from in roleplay. A snowflake character usually has negative connotations and refers to a character, who is excessively and explicitly trying to be different and unique. A snowflake character is often mistaken for a Mary-Sue and it may often be the case, but it isn't necessarily so:
    A character can be different and unique (snowflake) without being perfect or overpowered (Mary-Sue).
    A character can be perfect and overpowered (Mary-Sue) without being different and unique (snowflake).

    As mentioned, the problem and the negativity arises, when a character is excessively and explicitly trying to be different by e.g. sprouting wings or being the sole survivor of a faction, which was eradicated in the canon lore. For instance having an all powerful, time travelling, uber strong and undefeatable character that never suffers negative effects from using magic or cannot be harmed… You get the point. It’s just poor roleplay. No one likes these kinds of characters.
    More often than not, this use of a 'stand out feature' becomes the focus of a character, rather than the premise or backstory, which leaves them closed off to developing the character and therefore unable to progress in RP interactions.

    Considering most characters are, in some way, already unique and in a league of their own, if made right, these sorts of over-the-top or uber-special characters are just completely unnecessary.
    Being different and unique is not necessarily a bad thing if done right. But be mindful of what you do and how you do it. Try to stay within the lore as much as possible. Natural and plausible alterations or additions to the lore is a natural part of roleplaying within a universe / setting, but try not to make it too extreme or blatant copies from other universes or other characters within the same universe. No one wants to see someone exactly like the Dragonborn running around in Elder Scrolls Online for example.
    Perfectly normal characters without tragic backgrounds can be just as interesting and memorable as a blatant snowflake. Don’t feel like you have to make yourself stand out.



    3. Character Development and Goals

    Another way of creating a well-rounded character is to give them goals. What does your character seek to achieve or become? An immensely powerful character, who has defeated all his enemies and achieved ultimate power is boring. He will stagnate, because what happens next? Character development is highly favourable and it makes for great roleplay, because your character changes based on his interactions with other characters and the roleplay he has been involved in.

    So try not to simply create a character just as you envision it. A character who is already fully developed and is as perfect and awesome as you could possibly envision. Make him work towards it and it may turn out completely different.



    4. Separating In-Character and Out-of-Character

    This is what I would argue is the most important part of roleplay!
    In character is everything that happens as you roleplay. Everything your character experiences. The fights he or she has and the conversations he or she has. Everything else is what we consider Out-of-Character: chatting with your friends in guild chat, whispering about plotlines and character developments.
    You should not, under any circumstances, mix the two!
    Everything from knowing a character’s name before having met them, knowing where they are already just because you can tilt the camera to see them despite them being hidden, all of that, should not be used In-Character!
    There is also the fact that if someone dislikes your character, do not take it Out-of-Character either.
    • Don't hate another player for what their character does to yours.
    • In-character relationships are not real relationships.
    • Don't turn in-character conflicts into out-of-character conflicts.
    • Just because your character is the rival of another, the players aren't.
    • Don't take anything said by another character about your character as being about you personally. It's not about you.


    These sorts of things can be hard for some to remember, even the best roleplayers will blend IC and OOC somewhat, but only to the point of making their character more realistic, like an actor taking on a role. Taking it any further than that is not only very bad for the roleplayers around you but for yourself as well.



    5. Metagaming & Godmodding

    These are what I would consider the second most important part of roleplay.
    Metagaming is the act of using Out-of-Character (OOC) knowledge In-Character (IC).
    When your character knows something that they should not know because it is something you have learnt ICly, that is the act of metagaming. Some examples of doing so are:
    • Your character says something that you know from out-of-character, but they were never told.
    • Your character says another character's name because you can read it above their head.
    • Your character goes to rescue another character, because you were told of the attack in guild chat.
    • Your character flees a location, because you know there will be an event where it blows up.
    • What you know is not what your character knows.


    It is reasonable that your character will know about the country/kingdom they come from, and a basic history of that region, but knowing everything about everything… No. Just… No.

    Godmodding is when your character has godlike or divine powers and/or if you control another character without their permission.
    Everything you do to other characters should ALWAYS be an ‘attempt’. You can’t assume that what you will do will happen without a chance to fail or interrupt, this is especially important when it comes to combat with other player characters.
    Let’s take a bit of an example:

    “Character A swings their sword and chops off Character B’s head.”

    You can see what was done wrong here was that the player did not use the word ‘attempt’ and presumed their action would be successful. This is very poor etiquette.

    “Character A swings their sword and attempts to chop off Character B’s head.”

    This is a proper emote, as it allows Character B to react and attempt to avoid the attack or interrupt it.
    Results for such IC combat can be determined many different ways, whether by the use of dice, by discussion and trust between players OOC, or various other methods.
    When the outcome is decided upon, the emote that follows should be:

    “Character B ducks to avoid the axe swinging for their head, and aims a kick towards Character A’s ribs.”

    This is in the case that Character B was successful in avoiding the attack, and as such the player was able to emote how they avoided being killed and their counter-attack.

    The only time that a level of control of each other's characters is acceptable is amongst such situations where roleplayers agree to cooperate with one another in performing actions together.


    6. Powerplaying

    Powerplaying is often mistaken for godmodding, but they are not the same. The difference is godmodding is when you impose something on another player's character, while powerplaying is when you manipulate or modify your own character's abilities to suit or survive a situation.
    This relates to the talk of Mary-Sue characters, your character should not know the solution to every situation, and is not perfect, therefore they should have situations where they are disadvantaged, and have to rely on others.
    Powerplaying is if you modify your character on the spot to solve a situation or save themselves.
    This can be in cases where a character pulls weapons out when they didn’t have them emoted in their possession, especially when attire would display such weapons, can be part of powerplaying as well as having skills that they didn’t have before the situation.


    7. Actions and Consequences

    Action and consequence. The two go hand in hand and should seem obvious, but this is something easily forgotten by many roleplayers, because they feel entirely in control of their characters and their eventual fate. It makes players feel like their characters are entirely safe and can't be harmed, so they let their characters provoke anyone they want, they try to harm anyone they can, steal and do anything, because they're safe. But this – of course – is terrible roleplay.

    This is a two way street. You should always consider your characters actions, don’t do whatever you want, or do something because you find it funny OOC, consider the strengths and weaknesses of your character, understand that they are not invincible and are quite pervious to harm if they are attacked, and consider the same for the person your character may be getting into a fight with, before your character would act against them. Just like you do in real life, you wouldn’t go and punch a guy bigger than you, would you? No, because there would be consequences. The same logic is applied for roleplay. Think similarly to how your character would in that moment, and decide how you would approach it, before emoting your action.
    You should also consider how your character would deal out consequences against another player character, you shouldn’t go straight for a kill move, warn them, perhaps attempt to cause them minor harm? Something to show that they have made a mistake.

    If you are unsure how to proceed in a situation, talk to the respective player OOCly, either as the one giving actions or the one dealing the consequences. Talk about it to avoid ending up in a bad situation, both ICly and OOCly.

    Some examples of such situations would be:
    • Killing or aiding in killing another character and expecting no retaliation.
    • Provoking or harming a higher ranked / stronger character and expecting no consequences.
    • Hugging another character and expecting no hug in return.
    • Infiltrating an enemy location and expecting not to be captured or hurt.
    I could go on.
    The point is, consider your character’s actions, always.


    8. Sticking to the Lore

    Something that every roleplayer will tell you is very, very, very important in roleplay. It’s quite simple. Don’t go changing the lore of the universe you’re playing in to suit your own desires. Just because lore sometimes has many interpretations shouldn’t mean you go changing it to fit what you want it to be.
    Some basics rules when dealing with any universes lore are these:
    1. Educate yourself about the lore of the game you’re playing. Read everything you can get your hands on and keep doing it in case updates are made to it.
    2. If you don’t know a lot of lore, then play a character that is inexperienced or has lived a sheltered life, make them rather young, or so on.
    3. Don’t be the long lost sibling of someone like a King, or somehow involved with a pre-existing lore character. Having your character connected to a lore character is a huge RPer no-no.
    4. Just because you know something, OOCly, about lore or history from a region, doesn’t mean your character has to be involved with them in any way. Make sure that your character abides by the lore of the Elder Scrolls universe.
    Know your lore!
    (This also applies to custom plots and guild lores, make sure you educate yourself as much as possible in what a group is about OOCly as well as ICly.)



    9. Descriptive Emotes

    Being descriptive with your emotes is useful for two things. First, it makes the roleplay more elaborate and interesting. Two, it helps other players understand the actions of your characters and give them the necessary information to emote back. Let's do an example:

    “Character A shoots an arrow at the soldier.”

    This isn’t very descriptive, and it doesn’t tell you where Character A shot the soldier, what the soldier is doing when they fire the shot, how they perform the shot, and so on. This makes it very difficult for the other player to emote a response. A better emote would be:

    “Character A stands firm and ready, the arrow notched against the drawstring of their bow, a slight shaking from the tension of the pull being clear to any in close proximity. With a slow exhale Character A let’s the string loose, and the arrow flies towards the soldier’s knee.”

    This emote is much better because it describes how Character A fires the arrow and where they were aiming for. Therefore, whoever plays the soldier, is able to make a much more descriptive emote themselves about what happens after.


    10. Emote Concision

    Concision refers to limiting emotes to the necessary information.
    Being descriptive with emotes is important, but there are also considerations to be made in terms of emote length and context. There is a tendency for long emotes to be considered better emotes, which is not necessarily the case. Creating descriptive emotes that contain sufficient information for the opponent to respond is important, but concision can be equally important.
    This may seem counter-productive to the previous part about descriptive emotes, but it is something to consider in terms of the context. Especially in large events with a lot of people, you will be met with large walls of text, which can be a lot to read through. At such a time it can be worth considering a limitation of embellishment in emotes to preserve flow and make it easier for the person in charge of the event to read them all.

    Make sure what you are emoting is relevant, you do not need to go into large detail about the colour of someone’s eyes or the way someone is standing if you are in the middle of a fight, nor do you need to go to incredible lengths to describe how your character looks in casual RP either. There’s a fine line between being descriptive and over-sharing details, but it is a line that must be balanced by everyone.

    It is worth the mention that this element is also subjective. In smaller groups of roleplayers where you may only be two or three, and are all experienced in multi-paragraphed, detailed emotes, diving into that may be perfectly acceptable, whereas in an event or a large group this sort of thing makes it more difficult for you and other players to interact. It is important to know your audience and be considerate of everyone's ability.


    11. Grammar and Punctuation

    When it comes to grammar and punctuation in MMORPG roleplay, there’s a lot of things to bear in mind. There are many roleplayers from different countries and not everyone is equally good at English, typing and grammar. Even native English speakers make mistakes, so don’t feel disheartened if you feel at a disadvantage.
    When it comes to roleplay, your emotes and sentences in-character is what other players are first met with. It’s like a handshake. While it doesn't necessarily reflect your skills as a roleplayer, it does show effort and it is more appealing to approach someone who makes an effort; even if it isn't perfect. A few simple improvements may be enough to help in this.
    For example:

    “character a stands firm and ready the arrow notched against the drawstring of their bow a slight shaking from the tension of the pull being clear to any in close proximity with a slow exhale character a lets the string loose and the arrow flies towards the soldiers knee”

    This is difficult to read because names are capitalised and there is no punctuation, making it difficult to see when one description is ended and another begins. It looks lazy, as if the player couldn't be bothered to use punctuation or capitalise letters.

    “Character A stands firm and ready, the arrow notched against the drawstring of their bow, a slight shaking from the tension of the pull being clear to any in close proximity. With a slow exhale Character A let’s the string loose, and the arrow flies towards the soldier’s knee.”

    It is easier to read, it makes it more appealing to approach Character A and it looks like he bothered to make an effort. It also makes misspelled words easier to accept, if the player at least bothers to capitalise and does his best to punctuate. The same goes for capitalising “I”, when the character refers to itself. Another example:

    the soldier looks at character a and says “i am amazing”

    Should be written as:

    The soldier looks at Character A and says “I am amazing.”

    Already the emote has improved, just by using the correct grammar and punctuation.
    If you’re not sure, always ask those around you, there’s no shame in talking to people and asking for help, and we do not learn if we don’t make mistakes.

    It is also worth noting that there is usually a form of punctuation that defines IC and OOC speaking during roleplay, that usually differs from person to person, so be aware of that too.


    12. Attire and Additionals

    Something that may seem rather obvious but can sometimes be overlooked is dressing your character appropriately for roleplay sessions. How you choose to style your character during PvE or OOC time in general is obviously your choice, but when you go into IC you should try and style your character’s attire as much as you can to suit them. For example, a commoner would not likely wear expensive and fine looking clothing or anything extravagant, in the same way that someone of nobility would not likely wear rags or the like.
    The same applies for all characters, rich or poor, soldier or commander, and as well to some regard the sort of class your character is (ICly). Again, for example, a paladin or soldier might be more inclined to wear armour more often than they would more common attire, and vice versa with rogues/assassin types wearing leathers over plate.

    It is also worth mentioning as a side note that, especially in games like Elder Scrolls Online, World of Warcraft, and so on, there are some very dramatic and extravagant armour sets, and that they might not always be appropriate for roleplay use. They might be able to be used for some things, of course, but it’s important to figure out when and where that might be appropriate.


    Edited by Sanguiness130 on December 4, 2021 6:47PM
    SANGUINESS
    [EU Server - @Sanguiness ]
    RPer and Lore Geek
  • Sanguiness130
    Sanguiness130
    ✭✭✭
    PART TWO: BACKSTORY CRAFTING


    To keep it simple your character should, in your first RP attempt, have a rather generic background for their race. Whether it be a warrior or normal citizen, it's usually best to start with something very simple. This entirely depends on what is normal for the race you have chosen.

    If you have trouble determining as to what would be appropriate, then usually try to aim for something that would explain as to how and why they ended up where they are now, location wise. After all, a soldier for the Ebonheart Pact will probably not end up wandering around Wayrest.

    A few examples of typical backgrounds would be:
    - An Imperial fleeing Cyrodiil and taking refuge in an area outside the war. This background is good because it allows your character to be pretty much anywhere with a viable reason.
    - A Bosmer in Valenwood, a rather normal sight and therefore unquestionable.
    - A Nord in Morrowind, likely there due to the easy access between the regions of the Ebonheart Pact.

    However, because roleplay can be so spread out, and not in every zone, you will often have to have your character in a place they wouldn't usually be seen in because of your search for RP. Therefore, a common trope is to have a traveler-based character, therefore they can be anywhere with a good reason. A nomadic lifestyle is also rather common in Elder Scrolls and as such doesn't demand a lot of explanation or problematic questions: nonetheless, be prepared and have your story asked about.

    If you're really struggling to come up with a backstory for your character then try and research about different groups within the race you play, see what professions they may have and what may allow your character to travel freely and more importantly meet other RPers and develop your character further.
    After all, roleplay is the best teacher when it comes to who your character is, let your roleplay experiences determine who they are and what they like and dislike; learn, adapt and discover firsthand what works and what doesn't and just.. Try new ideas!


    Edited by Sanguiness130 on November 28, 2021 12:48PM
    SANGUINESS
    [EU Server - @Sanguiness ]
    RPer and Lore Geek
  • Sanguiness130
    Sanguiness130
    ✭✭✭
    PART THREE: CHARACTER SKILLS


    The level of skills your characters have will be very important to your roleplay. Most will be fairly easy to determine; if you're a Bosmer you're bound to be good with a bow, if you're a Breton or Altmer you're likely to have an easier time doing magic, and so on and so forth.

    However, powerplaying is an easy thing to fall into if you aren't careful. My recommendation to newer ESO players is if you're unsure as to what sort of skills your character would have, start at the bottom and the basics. Very rough skills in one or two particular weapons, and/or one or two particular magic schools.
    This is a good way to avoid causing problems not just for others, but for yourself, when RP'ing for the first time in combat situations and forms of conflict.
    That said, a good way to avoid falling into such situations are to come up with rough stats or levels for your characters abilities, however not everyone enjoys or feels the need to do so, so there's not always a need to use one.

    If you're having a hard time working out as to what sort of power-levels your character would have, I would always recommend taking your backstory idea and the power-levels you have estimates for to another, more experienced player, e.g. an admin in a RP guild, to determine what suits best. Again I refer to my earlier point about keeping skills typical to your race. It's not always necessary, but a helpful suggestion to those with doubts.
    If nothing else, there are plenty of roleplaying resources for helping assess character skills in many roleplay hub guilds, never hesitate to ask for help!


    Edited by Sanguiness130 on November 27, 2021 6:04PM
    SANGUINESS
    [EU Server - @Sanguiness ]
    RPer and Lore Geek
  • Sanguiness130
    Sanguiness130
    ✭✭✭
    PART FOUR: ROLEPLAY GUILDS


    There are a great many roleplaying guilds out there in the Elder Scrolls Online community, most of which you can find advertised in some forum or website relating to Elder Scrolls. In this forum, you will find it under "Fiction and Roleplaying" here, or in "Guild Recruitment".

    Some great places to find roleplaying guilds I will link below for everyone's convenience:
    Please send in your suggestions of communities to link! The first linked are those I personally know of, and are by no means all of the one's that are out there!

    ESO RP Home Website: https://www.eso-rp.com/
    Legacies of Nirn EU Hub RP Server: https://discord.gg/EmRQa62PZa


    Edited by Sanguiness130 on November 27, 2021 6:10PM
    SANGUINESS
    [EU Server - @Sanguiness ]
    RPer and Lore Geek
  • Sanguiness130
    Sanguiness130
    ✭✭✭
    my_tweet9.png


    So I would like to thank you, reader, for making it this far! I appreciate so much you making it through my guide! I know it's very long so I've tried to space this up into sections as much as possible so it's easier to navigate than my previous one.
    I hope you liked it, and please if you have any suggestions just drop me a comment and let me know!

    I want to wish you the best of luck with regards to your ESO RP experience, and hope that you enjoy it! Getting involved with ESO RP is not for everyone, but if you find some joy in it then that's what matters.

    That's it folks! This is where I leave you!
    I hope this has been fun, educational and not too ranty or rambly, and that you came away having learnt something new!

    Many thanks, Sanguiness
    Edited by Sanguiness130 on November 28, 2021 1:26AM
    SANGUINESS
    [EU Server - @Sanguiness ]
    RPer and Lore Geek
  • Sanguiness130
    Sanguiness130
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    RESERVED
    SANGUINESS
    [EU Server - @Sanguiness ]
    RPer and Lore Geek
  • Sanguiness130
    Sanguiness130
    ✭✭✭
    RESERVED
    SANGUINESS
    [EU Server - @Sanguiness ]
    RPer and Lore Geek
  • Sanguiness130
    Sanguiness130
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    If folks have any feedback I would absolutely love to hear it! I am especially interested in people have recommendations to be added to the stories section, as whilst I know those from parts and races I enjoy, I don't know all!

    Comment below, let me know what y'all think and I wish you well!
    SANGUINESS
    [EU Server - @Sanguiness ]
    RPer and Lore Geek
  • Sanguiness130
    Sanguiness130
    ✭✭✭
    Some edits were made, but nothing wildly different has been done.
    Still!
    Thank you to the people who have shared their thoughts so far, I love to hear feedback and am welcome to much much more!
    SANGUINESS
    [EU Server - @Sanguiness ]
    RPer and Lore Geek
  • boggo
    boggo
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    Holy mother of god!
    Ultimate indeed…
    Congratulations! :smile:
    Edited by boggo on December 6, 2021 11:37AM
  • Sanguiness130
    Sanguiness130
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    boggo wrote: »
    Holy mother of god!
    Ultimate indeed…
    Congratulations! :smile:

    Thank you very much! I hope you enjoyed it and if you or any others have any thoughts, questions or anything at all please let me know :smiley:
    SANGUINESS
    [EU Server - @Sanguiness ]
    RPer and Lore Geek
  • Mandragora
    Mandragora
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    I appreciate the hard work, it is the maximum you can get in ESO.

    Still I wish there would be thematic RP daily quests or thematic questlines to support my background gameplay in ESO.
    It doesn't have to be something complicated like a whole guild, because only some of my alts would do it anyway, but more like to be able to continue the thematic quests as daily.
    PAWS (Positively Against Wrip-off Stuff) - Say No to Crown Crates!
  • Sanguiness130
    Sanguiness130
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    Mandragora wrote: »
    I appreciate the hard work, it is the maximum you can get in ESO.

    Still I wish there would be thematic RP daily quests or thematic questlines to support my background gameplay in ESO.
    It doesn't have to be something complicated like a whole guild, because only some of my alts would do it anyway, but more like to be able to continue the thematic quests as daily.


    Glad you liked it :smiley:

    Not sure what you mean by the second part, I assume you're referring to the idea that you would be able to RP things you have done during in-game questlines? As such I would always recommend caution, tying your character to events that happen in the games that wouldn't be particularly grand scale (like the Three Banner War for example) can be a bit of a tightrope to walk, if you catch my meaning? Especially when small quests can one day have a larger impact.
    Besides, there is so much potential in RP that you can always RP out doing a variety of things, guild wise or not, so don't necessarily just think about in game quests and events, expand your horizons.. There's always something to do! :smiley:
    Edited by Sanguiness130 on December 9, 2021 5:27PM
    SANGUINESS
    [EU Server - @Sanguiness ]
    RPer and Lore Geek
  • Mandragora
    Mandragora
    ✭✭✭
    Thank you for your positive answer. I think too much about negatives I cannot change, maybe it is better to focus on positives and enjoy the game for what is offering and there is a lot of good staff. And now I can use this guide for that :).
    PAWS (Positively Against Wrip-off Stuff) - Say No to Crown Crates!
  • Aendruu
    Aendruu
    ✭✭✭
    As some of you might know, I have created a "Beginners Guide to Elder Scrolls and Roleplay in ESO" guide before, but after request on that forum for an advanced guide to go into more subjects, and some thought on my part, I have decided to put the old and the new together into this ultimate mega guide for you, the reader!

    Sanguiness, this is outstanding! Kudos to you for all the hard work you've put into this... and thank you!

    The Green bless and keep you.
    "So, drinking is a sacrament to Y'ffre... because it's his way of reminding us not to take things too seriously... You know how the other Elves are. Altmer have their crystal towers, and that's how they want to be — cold and perfect. And Dunmer are just like their Red Mountain — smouldering and dark. We just want to have a drink and not worry about it."
    Isn't there more to it than that?
    "Well, there is, but it's not really important. So don't worry about it. After all, if you worry about it, you're living contrary to how Y'ffre would want you to. You see?"
    - Regring the Spinner
  • Sanguiness130
    Sanguiness130
    ✭✭✭
    Glad to see such positive reviews!

    More to come in the New Year folks! Watch this space!

    A belated Merry Christmas and pending Happy New Year everyone! :smiley:
    SANGUINESS
    [EU Server - @Sanguiness ]
    RPer and Lore Geek
  • Sanguiness130
    Sanguiness130
    ✭✭✭
    Hey there!

    So the upcoming topics to be added over next week will be:

    Coming to "Section Two: Legends and Stories"
    - Ayleids and their Influence
    - Death, Immortality and the Afterlife

    Coming to "Section Four: Roleplay"
    - Injury, Healing, and Character Death

    I will poke again once these new topics are up and in place!

    Let me know if you have any other topics you would like this guide to cover :smiley:
    SANGUINESS
    [EU Server - @Sanguiness ]
    RPer and Lore Geek
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