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What happened to that person who won 3 million crowns

ArgonianAustin
ArgonianAustin
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You think he/she still plays? Probably can make a lot of gold selling crown store items. If you get scammed who cares, you pretty much got infinite crowns, I bet buying every house would be like half a million though.
Just a Lizard Man that plays ESO with my twin brother khajiit_kyle
  • phairdon
    phairdon
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    Someone won 3 million crowns? wow.
    Your immersion is breaking my entitlement.
    Buff Sorc's

    Darkshroud the Cremator
    Rubeus Black
    Deathbyfur
    Deathbyfleas
    Evil Wizard Lizard
    White Sauce Error
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    Psijic Gentleman's Sausage


    CP1000+
  • Sylvermynx
    Sylvermynx
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    Huh, didn't know about that - but then I haven't been around very long....
  • Carl-lan
    Carl-lan
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    Was there a competition to win 3 million crowns? When did that happen? I'm from Australia so it was probably illegal in our country to enter the 3 million crown competition.

    Or maybe it didn't happen.
  • Hiruda
    Hiruda
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    i think you mix up with the 1 000 000$ contest ( #MILLIONREASONSTOPLAY )

    https://www.elderscrollsonline.com/en-us/news/post/25619
  • EvilAutoTech
    EvilAutoTech
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    Yeah, I still play...
  • Unfadingsilence
    Unfadingsilence
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    Hiruda wrote: »
    i think you mix up with the 1 000 000$ contest ( #MILLIONREASONSTOPLAY )

    https://www.elderscrollsonline.com/en-us/news/post/25619

    This and no they hit like lvl 35 or 40 "not even getting any CP" and he quit and got married
  • ArgonianAustin
    ArgonianAustin
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    Hmm actually from reading the post I linked it looks like they changed the second place winner. I remember reading about the 3million crowns though.
    Just a Lizard Man that plays ESO with my twin brother khajiit_kyle
  • ArgonianAustin
    ArgonianAustin
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    Ok I just figured it out. Instead of 1 person getting 3 million crowns they changed it to 1000 people getting 3000 crowns. Did the math and that makes 3 million crowns before they changed it.
    Just a Lizard Man that plays ESO with my twin brother khajiit_kyle
  • Ravereth
    Ravereth
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    What happened to that person who won 3 million crowns

    tenor.gif
  • Shewolf075
    Shewolf075
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    Reminds me of that other competition, #10MILLIONSTORIES whoever won this one had a chance to become a character in the game https://www.elderscrollsonline.com/en-us/news/post/26235?Enter-the-
  • Jayman1000
    Jayman1000
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    Id probly stay quiet or they'd try to steal my account...

    It's impossible to steal an account if you just create a good password. Like wH35u7yfg0Wrk or something similar (don't actually use that one I just wrote here for obvious reasons ;)).

    Such a random password is impossible to guess and even if they had the password they can't login from another device without entering the special one time code zos sends to our mail adrese, when you try to login to the account from a new device. Your account will be completely safe and you will not have to fear theft at all, ever.

    Edited by Jayman1000 on January 11, 2019 5:17AM
  • yodased
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    Jayman1000 wrote: »
    Id probly stay quiet or they'd try to steal my account...

    It's impossible to steal an account if you just create a good password. Like wH35u7yfg0Wrk or something similar (don't actually use that one I just wrote here for obvious reasons ;)).

    Such a random password is impossible to guess; your account will be completely safe and you will not have to fear theft at all, ever.

    This is actually bad advice because that password is too random and difficult to remember. The best passwords are two random non sequitor words, seperated by a dash or underscore with numbers and a special character.

    Spaceship_Turkey29! For example, its impossible to brute force, easy to remember and does not require compromising confidentiality by writing it down somewhere.
    Tl;dr really weigh the fun you have in game vs the business practices you are supporting.
  • Jayman1000
    Jayman1000
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    Jayman1000 wrote: »
    Id probly stay quiet or they'd try to steal my account...

    It's impossible to steal an account if you just create a good password. Like wH35u7yfg0Wrk or something similar (don't actually use that one I just wrote here for obvious reasons ;)).

    Such a random password is impossible to guess; your account will be completely safe and you will not have to fear theft at all, ever.

    password_strength.png

    Source: XKCD: Password Strength

    Well that is a good idea and you could avoid having to write down the password. Though imo it's always a good idea to write down your passwords in a safe location if you should forget it. Of course this requires you to understand how to store passwords in safe location and the average person are probably not skilled enough or may never be able to understand it; I realize that now.

    Though my password is still a gazillion times more difficult to guess. With 1000 guesses per second you would have to guess for 14.297.646.496.522 years which is, all things considered, better than 550 years of guessing ;).
  • Jayman1000
    Jayman1000
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    yodased wrote: »
    Jayman1000 wrote: »
    Id probly stay quiet or they'd try to steal my account...

    It's impossible to steal an account if you just create a good password. Like wH35u7yfg0Wrk or something similar (don't actually use that one I just wrote here for obvious reasons ;)).

    Such a random password is impossible to guess; your account will be completely safe and you will not have to fear theft at all, ever.

    This is actually bad advice because that password is too random and difficult to remember. The best passwords are two random non sequitor words, seperated by a dash or underscore with numbers and a special character.

    Spaceship_Turkey29! For example, its impossible to brute force, easy to remember and does not require compromising confidentiality by writing it down somewhere.

    Spaceship_Turkey29! is not very safe. Ending with a ! would be a common thing to do so you can bet the hackers are trying such things first. The same with making the first letter of each word capitalized and using two common words like spaceship and turkey and seperating with underscore. Even adding that two digit number is a common thing to do. That password would probably range somewhere between weak to fair on the password scale.

    Imo it's always a good idea to write down your passwords in a safe location if you should forget it and my post was made with this in mind, but I did not type that out, and I should have for clarity. Of course this requires you to understand how to store passwords in a safe location and the average non-tech savvy person are perhaps not skilled enough(?) or may never be able to understand properly(?); I realize that now.

    If we could do a compromise of sorts I would say create from imagination four gibberish words and put them together, then add a number after one word. For example: KaptukHolif9TunGH. I would easily enough be able to memorize this and there would not really be anything common here for the hackers to assume a guess on. So while much less safe than my first suggestion, it is still immensely safe AND can easily be memorized.
    Edited by Jayman1000 on January 11, 2019 5:40AM
  • Jayman1000
    Jayman1000
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    Jayman1000 wrote: »
    Id probly stay quiet or they'd try to steal my account...

    It's impossible to steal an account if you just create a good password. Like wH35u7yfg0Wrk or something similar (don't actually use that one I just wrote here for obvious reasons ;)).

    Such a random password is impossible to guess; your account will be completely safe and you will not have to fear theft at all, ever.

    password_strength.png

    Source: XKCD: Password Strength

    Why is it only 1000 guess per second? I would think a modern day computer with a strong cpu would be able to process millions of guesses per second which would make the "common four words" method much less safe. How did they come up with "1000 guess per second"?
  • starkerealm
    starkerealm
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    yodased wrote: »
    Spaceship_Turkey29! For example, its impossible to brute force, easy to remember and does not require compromising confidentiality by writing it down somewhere.

    I don't think you understand what, "brute forcing," a password is.

    Brute forcing encryption keys of any variety involves simply testing every possible combination in sequence. You can skip some very basic testing if it violates the prerequisite data format. For example, if a password must be at least three characters long, there's no reason to test one and two character passwords.

    At that point, there are 255 characters possible at each node. Each ones needs to be tested. Realistically, in basic password cracking, you can cut that down to about 75 to 100, for the "commonly" used characters. It's highly unlikely even a savvy user will be hand keying in alt-codes to generate null characters that appear to be spaces.

    So, then you test each possible password. Think, 00-00-00, then 00-00-01, then 00-00-02, and so on, until at ff-ff-ff, it kicks over to test 0-0-0-1, and repeats. (Though, if you're curious, you probably only need to brute force values from 20 to 7e, for each space so, this will go faster than you realize. That said, if the native language isn't English, you may need to pick up a few more ranges to test, for things like umlauts.) Now, "Spaceship_Turkey29!" is incredibly vulnerable to brute forcing because it times out at 19 characters. That's... honestly, not an unreasonable length, but it is certainly vulnerable to brute forcing when the clock hits "53-70-61-63-65-73-68-69-70-5f-54-75-72-6b-65-79-32-39-21" your number is up. Actually, slapping an umlaut or accent mark in there might protect it from a script kiddie, because it would fall outside the 20 to 7e range.

    Hilariously, Spaceship_Turkey29! is also vulnerable to a dictionary attack, assuming someone does the bare minimum and adds a brute force check on the word itself, and attempted to brute force some additional characters on the end. This kind of optimized check is fiddly, and, honestly, if someone's trying to crack your password this way, they'll probably just go for brute force on a local copy of the login data. But, yeah... not great.
    Co-Host of The Tenets: a podcast focused on bringing new players up to speed in ESO.
  • starkerealm
    starkerealm
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    Jayman1000 wrote: »
    Why is it only 1000 guess per second? I would think a modern day computer with a strong cpu would be able to process millions of guesses per second which would make the "common four words" method much less safe. How did they come up with "1000 guess per second"?

    It's in the second panel. This is based on the idea of someone executing a live attack on a remote server with poor security protocols. Which isn't outside the realm of possibility. At that point, testing 1k passwords a second passes a scratch and sniff test, though may not be 100% accurate.

    Also, when it comes to cracking a password, without social engineering to do the heavy lifting, you're left with crunching each ASCII value in sequence. At that point, four common words will require significantly more effort to break. However, with systems like LastPass in existence, the time needed to execute a four word dictionary attack would be prohibitive. Especially if the user calmly sidestepped that by including a fifth word, or adding their phone number to the end.

    When it comes to password security, length is disproportionately effective against common cracking techniques. None of this stuff will stand up to someone with a stolen table of encrypted logins, but it will protect you from a script kiddie who's trying to get back at you for saying a mean thing about them on the internet.
    Edited by starkerealm on January 11, 2019 9:08AM
    Co-Host of The Tenets: a podcast focused on bringing new players up to speed in ESO.
  • Sergykid
    Sergykid
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    you guys underestimate hacking severely. You can have ANY PASSWORD they don't even need to guess it. ZOS has passwords saved in a database and they hack that place to access your account with whatever ur password may be.

    how do you think world's hackers hacked into government facilities, even NASA got hacked at some point in the history. What, they guessed their passwords?
    Too smart for dumb people. Too dumb for smart people.
  • Jaimeh
    Jaimeh
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    Shewolf075 wrote: »
    Reminds me of that other competition, #10MILLIONSTORIES whoever won this one had a chance to become a character in the game https://www.elderscrollsonline.com/en-us/news/post/26235?Enter-the-

    Did that actually come to fruition? I've seen another thread asking about it, but we never got official word as far as I remember...
    @stargold

    PC/NA CP810

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  • starkerealm
    starkerealm
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    Sergykid wrote: »
    you guys underestimate hacking severely. You can have ANY PASSWORD they don't even need to guess it. ZOS has passwords saved in a database and they hack that place to access your account with whatever ur password may be.

    how do you think world's hackers hacked into government facilities, even NASA got hacked at some point in the history. What, they guessed their passwords?

    v6JHwtK.gif

    So, years ago, I used to do admin on a board that stored their passwords in plaintext. Stupid ****s. We did have someone who got their hands on the forum's archives, who pulled the root admin's password. Yeah, there's a reason this isn't industry standard at all.

    Getting your hands on, most service's passwords, will net you a table of encrypted passwords. Most (sane) developers will use an asymmetric encryption process to secure the password. At that point, it's much harder to actually crack the password, but significantly easier to guess the password, run it through the encryption algorithm, and see if the result matches. Hence, locally brute forcing a password.
    Co-Host of The Tenets: a podcast focused on bringing new players up to speed in ESO.
  • Turelus
    Turelus
    Community Ambassador
    For those talking about passwords, these are very interesting videos.



    @Turelus - EU PC Megaserver
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  • idk
    idk
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    I have bought every home in the game, every costume, et al, and have maxed out all mounts on new characters in seconds.

    OMG, that 3 million crowns will last me a lifetime. Zos even arranged for me to buy my own crafting bag so I do not have to sub anymore. That did cost me 200k crowns but since they were free it was totally worth it.
    Really, idk
  • Danikat
    Danikat
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    One thing to consider is who you're trying to protect the account from.

    My Facebook password is a relatively short string of random letters and numbers (which is actually very easy for me to remember because of where I got it from, but that's another story) so if someone was using any type of automated password software it wouldn't take them long to get it. But that doesn't worry me because the chances anyone would try are incredibly low and if they do there's absolutely nothing on that account I'm worried about losing - no card details, no phone number etc. and I could easily contact all my friends by another method to let them know to ignore anything coming from my account.

    That password is there so if my sister thinks it would be funny to log into my account and post something stupid and embarrassing she won't be able to guess it. (We're both adults, she's a mother of 3, but yes she still would log in as me and post something like "I love the smell of my own farts".) Fortunately the people I know who might want to do that are highly unlikely to know how to get and use password cracking software.

    Whereas my ESO account has a long password made up of seemingly random words and characters, which is also easy for me to remember and possibly easy for someone who knows me to guess but which would take far longer to get through software.

    (Same logic with writing them down in a safe place. My ESO password is written in a notebook in my house, because if anyone breaks in they are not going to be looking for passwords to games. Although it's also not obvious it's a reminder for a password.)
    PC EU player. | PAWS (Positively Against Wrip-off Stuff) - Say No to Crown Crates!

    "Remember in this game we call life that no one said it's fair"
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